Slow Food Martha’s Vineyard’s talk on “terroir”

Slow Food supporters Sumner Silverman, center, and Kate Taylor sat front and center at Friday's event.
Photo by Ralph Stewart

Slow Food supporters Sumner Silverman, center, and Kate Taylor sat front and center at Friday's event.

This past Friday, March 23, at Morning Glory Farm Stand in Edgartown, Jackee Foster and Jan Buhrman treated guests to a Slow Food Martha’s Vineyard talk and tasting of wine and cheese with a focus on “terroir.”

A French noun meaning the characteristic taste and aroma imparted on cheese or wine by the environment in which they are produced, terroir is also evident in much of what we eat in addition to cheese and wine.

One example is oysters, as Ms. Buhrman, vice president of Slow Food M.V., found out when she brought Katama Bay oysters to an event in Washington D.C., where they were tasted with two other types. From nearly identical seed and grown similarily but from different parts of the east coast, the oysters all tasted different.

Ms. Foster, the cheesemaker at Mermaid Farm and Dairy in Chilmark, began with a slideshow of photos she took while attending Slow Food Cheese, an annual festival in Bra, Italy. After looking at photos of cheese studded with chocolate, made in containers such as wood and pottery, and paired with cigars, we were led through a tasting of eight cheeses and four wines.

There were two varieties of each type of cheese, one from New England and one from Europe.

First we tasted feta: one from our own Mermaid Farm, and one from France, paired with a vermintino wine from Sardegna, Italy. We went on to taste Le Chevrot, Cremont, Mil Ovejas, Coomersdale, Cappuccetto Rosso, and Winnimere, with sauvignon blanc, granache-mouvedre, and cabernet sauvignon.

Slow Food thanked event sponsors Morning Glory Farm, Our Market, and Big Sky Tent and Party Rentals for their generousity.

For more information about Slow Food M.V., visit slowfoodmarthasvineyard.org.