Lambs, daffodils, and good deeds in West Tisbury

There are four baby goats at Flat Point Farm, born over the past two weekends. Emily Fischer was full of news when I saw her the other evening. This year’s lambs are growing and a studio is going up on the property for Emily’s goat milk soap-making business and for her mother, Christa’s, felting projects. Christa has been doing workshops at the library and at Featherstone for several years now. Her felted creations are magical. Brava to both Fischer women and to the continued life and growth on the farm.

Emily’s other surprising news was that her eldest son, Milo, will be starting kindergarten this fall. It all happens so quickly, babies being born and growing up, having their own babies. I seem to ruminate about all sorts of things these days like my perspective on life in my town, having lived long enough to have a perspective.

Besides watching children grow, I have the perspective of watching the landscape around me. My weeping cherry tree was barely a whip when I planted it. Now it is a waterfall of long pink-flowered branches sweeping the ground, about 15 feet high. Ruth Kirchmeier came for a garden visit last week, remembering us wedging that tree into the car on one of our many plant-buying expeditions. Everything seems to have a story, to bring up memories, perspective. That’s one of the pleasures of gardening, remembering the friend who gave you a thinning of something that is now a huge patch, or the plan you had when you planted it. Whether that plan was adhered to or not, whether another plant proved more vigorous than the one you intended to feature, the height and width of mature plantings instead of the tiny specimens originally planted. I plant things farther apart now.

My friend Leslie Baker, ever the optimist, commented recently that the cool weather has made our spring flowers last much longer. We have had daffodils blooming for over a month now, the earliest ones still looking good, barely beginning to turn brown at the edges of their petals.

I am glad that Catherine Hoffman had a chance to see her daffodils bloom this one last time before she died last week. Catherine’s daffodils, diverse and abundant, have been one of the highlights of my drives along State Road for as long as I can remember. That and her golden chain tree, one of the few I have ever seen, that will bloom soon. She was a lovely person, an artist and a musician. My condolences to her family and all who knew her.

A reminder about Leah Littlefield’s Bat Mitzvah project. I mentioned before that she is collecting children’s books, new and gently-used, for a shelter in Boston. She has placed a second collection box at the West Tisbury Library, so you no longer have to drive to the Hebrew Center in Vineyard Haven to leave donations for her project. Her Bat Mitzvah will take place on June 21, so you still have time to contribute books for her.

The Friends of the West Tisbury Library need lots of Cronig’s bags with handles for sorting and storing books in preparation for their Annual Book Sale. If you have some to spare, please leave them at the sheds at the West Tisbury School. Books for the sale may be left there, too, but the Friends ask that large donations be held until they move into the school gym after July 7. This year’s sale runs from August 1 to 4.

The Library Foundation’s Speakeasy Series resumes next Wednesday evening, May 14, with authors Ward Just and Paul Schneider the featured guests at State Road Restaurant. Hors d’oeuvres and light refreshments will be served from 5:30 to 7 pm for $30 per person. The West Tisbury Library Foundation Inc. was incorporated “to promote and advocate for the expansion, improvement, maintenance and support of the West Tisbury Free Public Library.” The Speakeasy Series has been one of their most popular fundraisers.

Emily Sims Solarazza will lead two yoga classes at the library. Laughing Yoga for Adults begins Monday, May 19, at 5:30 pm. Laughing Yoga for Kids will meet on Thursdays at 4 pm, beginning May 22.

The library’s Saturday drop-in crafts have expanded with the new space. Family crafts will be set up in the Children’s Room from 11 to 3. Teen/Tween projects will be out during the same hours in the Young Adult’s Room downstairs. Crafts are free and open to the public.

Martha’s Vineyard Museum Chief Curator Bonnie Stacy has a new book, “Martha’s Vineyard,” featuring over two hundred photographs and stories about the history of our island. She will talk about the book and show images from it in the Museum Library on Tuesday, May 13, at 5:30 pm.

The Martha’s Vineyard Cancer Support Group fundraiser, Evening Under the Stars, will be held at Farm Neck on Thursday, May 15, 5:30 to 8:30 pm. Enjoy a buffet dinner, drinks, dessert, and dancing to music by Mike Benjamin. The $100 donation goes entirely to help Island cancer patients and their families with various costs of their treatment.

Someone noted recently that I haven’t mentioned Nelson in a while. He is now an eight-month old macho male cat. He has learned how to use the cat flap, so he comes and goes with more independence. He has become an excellent killer of mice, moles, and voles, encouraging me as the gardening season progresses. He is still very affectionate and he still bites, but he is a wonderful cat. I am totally smitten with my guy.

The West Tisbury column for May 1 was inadvertently omitted from the print edition of The Times. It was posted online and is still available there at the above link. – Ed.

Got West Tisbury news? Share it with Hermine at mvtimes.com/staff/hermine-hull/