Editorial: Run for the Martha’s Vineyard Commission

Editorial: Run for the Martha’s Vineyard Commission

In November, Island voters will be asked to elect nine members of the Martha’s Vineyard Commission (MVC). With less than two weeks until the July 29 deadline to file nomination papers, as of Friday no new candidates had stepped forward to place their names on the ballot, Janet Hefler reports in today’s issue.

This is unfortunate. The MVC could benefit from new perspectives and new faces.

The MVC operates with a $1.5 million budget and staff of 10 full-time employees. The commissioners have the power, through the MVC’s permitting authority, to supersede town boards and stop a development in its tracks, or send it on its way with significant conditions or none at all. It is an intoxicating responsibility.

MVC decisions are far reaching and reverberate throughout the Vineyard economy, often in ways that are not immediately visible. Behind every major construction project or development before the MVC there is a host of Island trades people and business people waiting for a decision, people who depend on a weekly paycheck and are part of the Vineyard’s tourism and construction economy.

It is possible that Island voters are pleased with the MVC. That seems unlikely judging from the many comments that have swirled around recent projects.

Unfortunately, Islanders tend to be in favor of the MVC when a project they oppose is being skewered and critical of the MVC when it is a project they favor, all the time unmindful of the fact that skewering is not the object of the review process, even if it sometimes feels that way to the applicants.

A more likely reason is that few people have the stamina or appetite for the minutiae that now characterizes MVC discussions. That could change. Commissioners could stick to the broad strokes and leave the details to local boards. With some discipline, meetings need not consume hours and hours.

Nancy Gardella, executive director of the 1,000-member Martha’s Vineyard Chamber of Commerce, told The Times she can understand why a small business owner, for example, especially one with young children, would be reluctant to run.

Ms. Gardella did not say what if any efforts the Chamber has taken to encourage members to run for the MVC, or to see that business interests are represented.

Lawyers and retirees are well represented on the MVC. Young working people with families, members of the building trades, retail business owners, all groups under represented on the MVC, should consider stepping off the sidelines and onto the field. Ten signatures is all it takes.

The incumbent members of the MVC deserve gratitude for their many hours of service. In many ways, it is a thankless task. The willingness of others to step up to the plate is not a rebuke.