SSA anticipates Monday cancellations; HyLine, Island Queen cancel Monday service

The slow moving storm is expected to lash southern New England with rain, high winds and surf beginning Sunday night through Wednesday.

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The MV Woods Hole and the Island Queen departed Oak Bluffs late Saturday afternoon under threatening skies, and full of passengers. – Jamie Stringfellow

Updated 11 am, Sunday, Sept. 4

Tropical storm Hermine continues to move northeast. She is expected to bring tropical storm conditions to the Vineyard through Wednesday with rain and gusty winds.

Travelers are advised to check with ferry companies for any storm-related disruptions. The Island Queen, HyLine and Seastreak have announced service suspensions.

Late Sunday morning, the Steamship Authority announced it was diverting ferries departing from and arriving at the Oak Bluffs terminal to Vineyard Haven.

The SSA issued the following bulletin Sunday: “Based on the current forecast and weather conditions, the Steamship Authority expects to continue operations for the rest of today’s scheduled trips for both the Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket routes. The Steamship Authority is anticipating that it may have to suspend ferry service on Monday for both the Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket routes due to the impacts from Tropical Storm Hermine.”

Current SSA conditions may be viewed at steamshipauthority.com/traveling_today/status.
To make or modify a reservation call 508-477-8600, or go to steamshipauthority.com or visit one of the terminals.

The Island Queen, which provides seasonal passenger ferry service between Falmouth and Oak Bluffs announced that it has canceled its Sunday, Sept. 4, and Monday, Sept. 5 sailings due to weather concerns. For more information, visit islandqueen.

HyLine announced service from Hyannis to the islands would be suspended Sunday and Monday. For more information visit HyLine.

Seastreak, which provides service between New Bedford and the islands, announced that Seastreak has suspended service to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket until the New Bedford hurricane barrier re-opens. For more information go to seastreak.com/.

For additional ferry information:
Rhode Island Fast Ferry service: vineyardfastferry.com/

For additional information on the storm refer to the National Hurricane Center.

The National Weather Service has issued a Tropical Storm warning for Southern New England:
Post tropical storm Hermine will affect the Rhode Island south coast and Massachusetts southeast coast with rough surf, dangerous rip currents, beach erosion and a period of gusty winds late Sunday through at least Monday.
A tropical storm warning is now in effect for the south coasts of Rhode Island and Massachusetts including Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket and Cape Cod. Tropical storm force conditions are most likely late Sunday night into Monday mainly over the islands and along the immediate south coast. Since Hermine is expected to stall south of New England squalls with tropical storm force gusts may linger at times through mid-week across the Cape and islands.
Tropical storm force wind gusts to 50 mph will arrive across Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket after midnight and then spread north along the immediate south coast toward daybreak. The wind may gust between 50 and 60 mph on Nantucket for a time during Monday morning. The wind gusts along the immediate south coast and islands will likely down some trees and large branches and result in scattered power outages. some trees may be more susceptible to wind damage due to stress from drought conditions.
Along the coast dangerously rough surf and life threatening rip currents will occur tonight and continue to mid week at all ocean exposed Rhode Island and Massachusetts beaches although conditions will be most severe along the Rhode Island south coast, Block Island, east and south facing shorelines of Nantucket and the outer Cape ocean side from Wellfleet through Eastham and Orleans to Chatham. The most significant beach erosion is anticipated to occur during the Monday high tides.