Bezahler arraigned on felony drug charges

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Aaron Bezahler was arraigned on two felony drug charges in Dukes County Superior Court Thursday morning. — Rich Saltzberg

Aaron Bezahler was arraigned before Judge Angel Kelley Brown in Dukes County Superior Court Thursday morning on drug charges.

Bezahler, 22, pleaded not guilty to two felony charges: distribution of a Class A drug and conspiracy to violate drug laws. He pled not guilty to both charges. The charges were transferred from Edgartown District Court after a Dukes County grand jury indicted Bezahler in February.

Bezahler requested a court-appointed attorney and was assigned Boston- and Falmouth-based attorney Rachel Self. Self was not present at the arraignment.

Bezahler’s $1,000 bail transferred from the district court to the superior court. He therefore did not need to post new bail, and left the courtroom freely after his charges were read and his plea was entered.

His next court appearance has not been scheduled.

In December, Brenda Williston-Floyd attempted to have Bezahler charged in the overdose death of her son, 26-year-old Antone Silvia.

Although a clerk magistrate brought the charge of manslaughter forward, Cape and Islands District Attorney Michael O’Keefe declined to prosecute because the complaint was “defective as a matter of law.”

Alexander Carlson was also arraigned Thursday on drug charges. Carlson pled not guilty to one charge of possession of a Class B drug with intent to distribute, an offense he’s been charged with previously, court records show. He requested a court-appointed attorney and was assigned Edgartown attorney Robert Moriarty. Carlson’s charge was transferred from Edgartown District Court after a Dukes County grand jury indicted him in February. Carlson’s $25,000 district court bail transferred to the superior court.

Judge Brown issued a warrant for Roan Elgart after the accused failed to appear in court Thursday. Elgart was scheduled to be arraigned on charges of distribution of a Class A drug and conspiracy to violate drug laws, both subsequent offenses, court records show.