Authors Posts by Jamie Stringfellow

Jamie Stringfellow

Jamie Stringfellow
79 POSTS 2 COMMENTS

Click on the map below to find Yard Sales all over the Island.

View our interactive yard sale map below.

It’s summer and yard sales are happening all over the Island each weekend. Here’s another handy map for all you bargain hunters looking to visit this weekend’s yard sales.

Although we value the time-honored tradition of circling the sales we want to visit in the MV Times, then plotting them out (numerically, with maps, etc)… we think this is better: just click on a “Yard Sale” way point, and it’ll tell you when, where, and what.

Now you can plot your route on our map, and take it with you on your phone; no more pen and ink needed.

 

The Garden Angels, back: Caleb Carr, Lily Bennett, Grace Clark, Nicolai Evans, Dalia Bennett. Front: Jessica Donahue, Jen Slossberg (owner) with Diamond and Poppy Belle, Sydney Dunbrack. – Photograph of Angels by Lynn Christoffers, photo illustration by Kristofer Rabasca with help from Henri Rousseau (via picshype.com).

Welcome to The Local! What the heck is The Local? We took our Home & Garden publication, and added stories we used to run in our Health & Fitness, Pets, Homegrown, and Off the Rock supplements, and created a new one — Island Style (oh, and another one called Wicked Useful, which we hope you’ll find to be…wicked useful). We’ll be highlighting everything special (and occasionally frustrating, humorous, and plain old transcendent) about Good Living on MV.

Find stories here.

You’ll find The Local in your mailbox four times this year (you’ll also see it in Island stores and hotels). We’ll aim to enliven, enlighten, and connect you with your fellow locals each issue.

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Norman Bridwell in his Edgartown studio. File photo by Ralph Stewart.

There will be an open house to celebrate life of Norman Bridwell, the celebrated author most well known for the “Clifford, The Big Red Dog” series, at  2:30 to 4:30 pm Monday July 20, at the Federated Church, 54 South Summer Street, Edgartown. For more information, call 508-627-4421.

Find Mr. Bridwell’s obituary here.

And we got to taste.

Tina Miller and Rachel Fox prepare some dishes you can find at the new Rosewater Market on South Summer Street in Edgartown. – Siobahn Beasley

When Tina Miller worked at Plum TV on the Vineyard several years ago, she produced “Dish with a View’— a segment devoted to great food, made by great Island cooks, served in great Island homes (for sale). Ideally, homes with views.

Chicpea salad.
Chicpea salad.

When we told her about launching The Local, she said “You should steal my idea.”

So we did. You might have noticed we adapted it to a couple stories in our first Local, in April: Yoga poses done (labeled in Portuguese!) in a gorgeous house for sale in Chilmark, and “upcycled” clothing and bags by Noava Wibel in an upcycled Ocean Park home.

Yogurt parfaits and chia pudding.
Yogurt parfaits and chia pudding.

How fitting, we thought, that this month we can feature Dish with a View’s originator as a way to preview a few of the treats she and partners Rachel Fox and Julia Celeste will be featuring at Rosewater Market, which is just about to (or just did, depending when you’re reading this) open on South Summer Street in Edgartown.

Tina, you might remember, wrote one of the first Vineyard farm-to-table cookbooks, Vineyard Harvest about ten years ago, and opened The Roadhouse restaurant when she was a mere 24. She went on after that to own and run Cafe Moxie, and most recently managed Flatbread PIzza.

At Rosewater, where the partners also include Julia’s father, Chris Celeste, and his wife, Nancy Kramer, you can get good food from 6 am (coffee, baked good and newspapers ) to 6 pm every day of the week. The kitchen opens for breakfast sandwiches at 7 am.

Veggie and Smoked salmon-Rye bread with fresh herb goat cheese, grilled asparagus, radish, cucumber, and radish sprout.
Veggie and Smoked salmon-Rye bread with fresh herb goat cheese, grilled asparagus, radish, cucumber, and radish sprout.

“We will have grab and go food,” Tina told us, “and a case with fresh, healthy salads and the makings of a meal — grilled flank steak, seared tuna, smoked brisket, whole Island chickens. There’s no table service but, she said,  “You can grab a table inside or out in our brick patio and people watch. We will provide boxed picnics, breakfast pastry and coffee catering, featuring Chilmark coffee for your business (or you have a house full of guests).” And coming soon: chef-catered dinner parties.

Good luck, Tina and crew, and thanks for the idea. And the gluten-free cream cheese brownies. And the veggie and smoked salmon sandwich on rye, with fresh goat cheese and grilled asparagus.

 

Some Recipes

Cream cheese  brownies and apricot marmalade muffins.
Cream cheese brownies and apricot marmalade muffins.

Cheesecake Brownies (Gluten-free option)

Brownie:

6Tbls (3oz/85g) Unsalted Butter

8 oz (225g)  Bittersweet or Semisweet Chocolate

¾ C (150g) Sugar

1 Tsp or half pod Vanilla

2 large Eggs

¼ C All purpose or gluten free flour

Over a double boiler melt together butter, chocolate and salt.  When fully melted mix in sugar and stir until grains fully dissolve.  Add flour and mix vigorously for one minute or until the batter starts to come together and pull off of sides of bowl.  Pour into a square tin lined with parchment and set aside.

 

Cheesecake filling:

16 oz Cream Cheese

1/2 c plus 2 Tbl of sugar

2 large egg yolks

1 tsp or 1/2 pod of vanilla
Whip all ingredients together until fully incorporate.  Place 8 equal dollops of batter on top of brownie batter.  Being careful not to mix the two instead spreading a separate layer on top of brownies.  Then using a fork or knife, cut through to bottom of brownies swirling in some of the bottom layer without mixing it fully, spreading just enough to make a pattern. Do this in three separate lines.  Bake at 325 for 20 minutes or until the cheesecake forms a shiny crust and is a light golden brown color.

Allow to cool fully before serving.  Cut off crust on all four sides, then cut into equal portions. Makes six equal rectangles.

 

Apricot Marmalade Muffins w/ Blueberries

Ingredients:

¾ Cup Kamut Flour

¾ Cup Spelt Flour

¾ Cup Yellow/Blue or White Corn flour (fine ground)

2 Tsp Baking Powder

2 ¼ Cup Sugar (I prefer wholesome sweetener unbleached raw sugar)

¾ Cup + 2 Tbl Butter

4 Eggs

1 Tsp Salt

zest of 1 lemon

½ Vanilla bean pod or 1 ½ tsp vanilla extract

2 Cups Buttermilk

½ cup Apricot Marmalade

8 oz Fresh or Frozen Blueberries

Method:

Line a muffin tin with parchment paper or muffin liners and heat oven to 350 degrees.

Whip together sugar, butter, salt, vanilla bean  and lemon zest until light and fluffy.  Add eggs one at a time allowing to regain light fluffy texture with each addition.

Sift flours and baking soda together.  Using the 1:1 measurements incorporate milk and dry ingedients in 3 parts.  Mix until just incorporated.  Add blueberries and gently mix until well distributed.

Fill tins half way. Use a tablespoon to spoon marmalade into tins and then cover with more batter filling to tins to the brim.

Bake for 35/45 minutes of until batter is set and cakes are golden brown. Cool and enjoy!

These muffins keep for 4 days out or 1 month in the freezer.  If freezing toast/reheat before eating.

About that House

FoodView-11.jpgThe house with the view is a 5BR/3BA and 2 1/2 BA on 3.44 acres just off Tea Lane, built in 2002 by noted Island builder, Heikki Soikkeli, who is known for his work at South Mountain and later on his own, most notably at Blue Heron Farm. The homeowner, Howard Pitsch,  will tell you that he “designed the house like a big bow tie”…that is the kitchen in the center, the living / dining to the right and the first of two master suites to the left.

FoodView-15.jpgThe homeowner, a Brooklynite, used to run a book store back in the day on the site of what is now the Chilmark Tavern.  The home is being offered completely furnished and Mr. Pitsch is even including his 2001 Subaru.. the ideal Island car.

russellmaloney.com/properties/73bijahsway.html )

Russell Maloney Real Estate, LLC

www.russellmaloney.com

508-645-2478

cell: 774-563-0633

Good for carrying whatever you want.

Mr. Brooks uses various pieces of wood from around his shop, and can burn your name into the side. – Photo by Michael Cummo

Chris Brooks, a former editor at the Boston Globe, works at LeRoux at Home, and makes useful things from wood in his basement at home in West Tisbury.

Use them to carry whatever you want – bears, or beers.
Use them to carry whatever you want – bears, or beers.

I wanted to make something for each of my four grandchildren that was simple and useful. After I made the four totes, and before I delivered them, my wife showed them to several friends. Pretty soon, I had made and given away 13 of them, so I kept making them. Several went to support two Island organizations — Friends of Family Planning’s Memorial Day Weekend Show, and the Windemere Nursing and Rehabilitation Center for their annual auction to support their recreation program. So I thought I might test the broader market, with the option of adding engraved names burned into the wood on the front of the totes.

I’ve always worked with wood — Shaker-style country furniture, blanket chests, boxes, lamps, etc. Several years ago I went on a tear, making table lamps from Vineyard driftwood that I sold at LeRoux at Home in Vineyard Haven, where I work part-time. Trouble was, other folks decided to collect driftwood, and my supply dried up.

The trick is to cut parts of several totes at the same time. I generally use lumber that’s around my shop. That’s why the totes have five or six different woods in them. I almost never throw away scraps of wood. There are always uses for all but the smallest pieces. Species of wood that appear in the totes include cherry, mahogany, black oak, pine, birch, walnut, and koa from Hawaii — whatever is on top of the pile.

 

Mr. Brooks’ wooden totes can be used to hold magazines or coloring books, toys for kids or dogs, or as a beer carrier. Use your imagination, he says. The price is $60, including tax, which includes an optional inscription of a name burned into the box. To order them, contact Mr. Brooks at .508-560-2720

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New Oak Bluffs sushi spot brings fresh fish to Circuit Avenue.

A rainbow roll from Siren with crab, avocado, cucumber, and assorted fish. – Photo by Jamie Stringfellow

Once upon a time, long ago, the idea of eating sushi on Circuit Avenue would have seemed … unfathomable. Like a fairy tale. I’m talking about the time — probably three Celtics dynasties ago — when burgers, pizza, and tacos ruled the town.

Sushi was for places far away — Tokyo, or maybe New York. But on Main Street, Oak Bluffs? Or even more fantastical … at the Lampost?! No.

My new favorite appetizer for summer – Tuna MV. – Photo by Jamie Stringfellow
My new favorite appetizer for summer – Tuna MV. – Photo by Jamie Stringfellow

Not that there was anything wrong with the Lampost. In those days, when I set out to Circuit Avenue in search of food, entertainment, and beer, I found myself often at the Lampost, watching those previously mentioned dynastic Celtics beat whoever stood in their way, and in 1985, and again in 1986, it was the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Championships. Meaning, I have a lot of vivid, very happy memories of sunny afternoons at the historic Circuit Avenue watering hole, drinking beer. Maybe having some beer nuts.

But definitely not sushi.

Now that we have been spoiled with sushi on our shores in all corners, we can celebrate once again, because the Lampost, or more precisely, Siren — their cool new, sort-of-down-under hotspot — not only serves sushi, but serves championship sushi. And in a fun little tie-in to Boston sports, the Patriots roll is one of the best things I’ve ever eaten.

Now, to Siren, and my Circuit Avenue memories of that place.

Siren is now open on Circuit Avenue in Oak Bluffs, under the Lampost. – Photo by Michael Cummo
Siren is now open on Circuit Avenue in Oak Bluffs, under the Lampost. – Photo by Michael Cummo

Back in those days, of Celtics (but not Patriots!) preeminence, Siren was called the Rare Duck, and forms yet another vivid callback in my culinary (perhaps libationary is more apt) history. These were the days when whatever is where the Atlantic recently was (the collection of galleries and retail and real estate offices, next to the Arcade) was called the Boston House. There was a guy named Phil (I’ll buy a Patriots roll for anyone who remembers his last name) who played the guitar, and alternated between the Boston House and the Rare Duck. The Duck had (as I remember it) brick floors, low ceilings, and best of all — frozen mudslides.

Luckily, the best of the Duck has survived — that atmosphere that makes you feel like you’re hiding out in some speakeasy, that cool floor (now a glazed concrete), and great drinks. And bonus: sidewalk dining as well.

Siren has been the latest step in the Lampost’s turnaround, and 11 years in the making, according to co-owner Adam Cummings. There has long been the desire to have a kitchen in the space, and several different ideas were thrown around more recently, as the dream evolved. “At the end of the day,” said Mr. Cummings, “we went with what we really liked to eat, and sushi was the logical choice.”

The renovations involved to bring Siren to life included taking the space down to the studs, reinforcing the building, replacing the floor, redoing the bathrooms, and even moving the bar. You’ll notice the oversize bar is now in the middle of the restaurant, and the face of the old bar was repurposed for the new one. The walls of the former Dive Bar (the latest iteration of the space until last year) were reclaimed and used to make the tables. To add to the nautical theme, sailing rope was inlaid into the bar, and lights from underneath the bar give the appearance of lights at the bottom of a boat. There are prints of beachscapes by local artists lining the walls, and the iridescent green- and copper-colored concrete floor evokes thoughts of a calm sea.

And Siren? The name itself is connected to the sea, and pays homage to the mermaids painted on the Lampost’s sign, as a siren is the enchantress of the sea.

So back to the sushi. The menu is as impressive as it is affordable. A full selection of sushi and sashimi as well as maki rolls and special rolls round off the menu. For those rare breeds who prefer simpler fare, there’s the “Not So Sushi” menu, which includes pasta, salads, and tacos, as well as a kids’ menu inspired by the favorites of Mr. Cummings’ children.

So, what did we have? Well, that championship Patriots roll, a wicked fresh Rainbow Roll, a Spicy Tuna roll that my friend loved so much she wouldn’t share with me, and a lovely, bright green seaweed salad. My favorite, other than the Patriots roll (which involves lobster, by the way), was what will now become my summer go-to appetizer: Tuna MV, a bright salad of orange, avocado, many hunks of yellowtail and a spicy soy/citrus sauce. And all at good prices, even the wine.

Best of all, unlike the surly (but affectionately so) service in my days of yore, the wait staff could not have been better.

 

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A fire on Border Road, a dirt lane that meets the Lagoon near the Norton Farmstand, has closed the Edgartown-Vineyard Haven Road near the boundary of Oak Bluffs and Tisbury, while firefighters from Oak Bluffs and Tisbury continue to extinguish the fire.

A full report will follow.

Marian Johnson is the women's winner.

Race winner Ben Bosworth of Dorchester, a student at Connecticut College in New London, was all alone at the finish. – Photos by Ralph Stewart
Young runners in patriotic gear sprinted in pre-race fun run.
Young runners in patriotic gear sprinted in pre-race fun run.

Ben Bosworth of Dorchester ran away with the Murdick’s Run The Chop Challenge five-mile race on a mild, overcast Fourth of July morning in Vineyard Haven. Mr. Bosworth, the 2013 race winner, topped the field of 528 runners by nearly two and a half minutes, completing the Tisbury School-West Chop course in 26:51. Race runner-up Michael Schroeder of West Tisbury ran 11 miles prior to the event and still finished the Chop Challenge in a solid 29:27.

omen's champ Marian Johnson comes to the finish line just ahead of Scott Bosworth, father of race winner Ben.
omen’s champ Marian Johnson comes to the finish line just ahead of Scott Bosworth, father of race winner Ben.

Marian Johnson of Weston and Chilmark was the women’s winner, placing ninth overall at 31:02. Claire Woodward of Orleans was the women’s runner-up and finished 15th overall with a time of 32:21.

Click on the map below to find Yard Sales all over the Island.

Click here to see all yard sales on one interactive map.

It’s summer and yard sales are happening all over the Island each weekend. Here’s another handy map for all you bargain hunters looking to visit this weekend’s yard sales.

Although we value the time-honored tradition of circling the sales we want to visit in the MV Times, then plotting them out (numerically, with maps, etc)… we think this is better: just click on a “Yard Sale” way point, and it’ll tell you when, where, and what.

Now you can plot your route on our map, and take it with you on your phone; no more pen and ink needed.

Cheers and champagne as the historic lighthouse is put in place.

Hats are in the air. –Photos by Patrick Phillips

And on Saturday, the Gay Head Light rested, reaching its final stop on a 129-foot move back from the site it had occupied since 1844.

A bottle of champagne is uncorked.
A bottle of Champagne is uncorked.

The journey from the crumbling edge of the cliffs at Gay Head began on Thursday when International Chimney Corp. began to move the historic beacon, while a crowd including Island residents, visitors, and reporters gathered to watch.

The building, which weighs in at 400 tons, was slid, via metal I-beams, across a path chosen for both its elevation and for the stability of the clay. One critical element in selecting the new site is the lack of groundwater, which is responsible for erosion. The project managers said they hope the new location will be stable for another 150 years.

Project leader Lenny Butler christens the lighthouse at its new location.
Project leader Lenny Butler christens the lighthouse at its new location.

Two days after it began, the trip was over, and once again, a crowd gathered to celebrate as project leader Lenny Butler popped the cork on a bottle of Champagne, and smashed it against the lighthouse, to the cheers of the crowd.

Though the lighthouse is being moved back away from the cliffs, the light will remain at the same elevation, as mandated by the Coast Guard.

In an interview with the Times on Thursday, Brian Vanderhoop, Aquinnah harbormaster and shellfish constable, said, “It had to be done.”  Mr. Vanderhoop said he was both happy and sad about the move. “I grew up with it right where it is, you know? The light always comes through my window, ever since I was a little boy.”

For a behind-the-scenes video interview, and more details on the engineering required to move a 400-ton lighthouse, click here.

View the webcam here.