Authors Posts by Nelson Sigelman

Nelson Sigelman

Nelson Sigelman
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Mill Pond is placid on a summer day. Photo by Michael Cummo.

A glimpse of Mill Pond in West Tisbury as I drove up-Island caused me to think about the effort by a determined group of residents to restore the historic waterway to a free-flowing stream. Their progress has been slow, but not nearly as difficult as that of the herring that continue to struggle to return to their natal waters each spring up and down our coast.

The offspring of those that survived the journey have by now begun their return to the sea. It is a natural cycle that man has interrupted along our coast to the detriment of a variety of species that include striped bass.

Fisheries management cannot succeed on the large scale if we do not think about the small scale, and do what we can to protect waterways — from the smallest brook to the largest river — from degradation.

Herring and white perch spawn in the lower reaches of Mill Brook, and native book trout cling to life in the upper reaches of the stream that begins in Chilmark, passes through several artificial impoundments in West Tisbury, such as Mill Pond, and streams into Tisbury Great Pond. There is also evidence that American eels still manage to use the stream.

Last May, with assistance from the state Division of Marine Fisheries and a group of volunteers, West Tisbury erected a fish ladder at the dam. How successful it is in allowing fish to navigate this obstacle remains to be determined. However, fish ladders are not a solution. They are a compromise intended to mitigate the harmful effects of a dam.

For example, in the northwest where dams help provide valuable hydroelectric power, fish ladders are used to help maintain passageways for salmon — not so successfully judging by the continued decline in salmon numbers. As a result, there is a concerted effort by conservation groups to remove as many dams as possible. Removal of the Elwha Dam in Olympic National Park, billed as the largest dam removal project in the world, has led to the return of salmon for the first time in a century in that river.

The U.S. Fisheries and Wildlife Service acknowledges the detrimental effects of dams, which “can block or impede migration and have created deep pools of water that in some cases have inundated important spawning habitat or blocked access to it. Dams also change the character of rivers, creating slow-moving, warm water pools that are ideal for predators of salmon.”

The Mill Pond, which warmed to more than 80 degrees this summer, is a case in point. We have no salmon, but we certainly have brook trout. That they survive is a testament to their resilience.

At one time in our nation’s history, progress was measured by how much we could extract from the environment. We erected dams on rivers and streams to pull power from the water with little thought about the consequences, which seemed minor compared to the benefits. In the last century that equation and our understanding of it began to change.

Today, the removal of unused dams attracts positive attention. In June, state and local officials celebrated the successful removal of the 84-foot long Bartlett Pond dam on Wekepeke Brook, a tributary of the North Nashua River, restoring upstream fish passage to approximately 18 miles of high-quality coldwater habitat. “With the dam’s removal, there has been an immediate return of native brook trout to the restored stretch of the river,” state Fish and Game Commissioner Mary Griffin said.

“Removing dams helps restore healthy rivers to provide clean water, reduce risks, enhance recreation opportunities, and preserve wildlife habitat,” said Wayne Klockner, State Director of the Nature Conservancy in Massachusetts, which has an office on Martha’s Vineyard and is in a position to comment on at least one Mill Brook impoundment.

Earlier last spring, the state’s office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) designated eight new river and wetland restoration projects across the state as Priority Projects, which qualified them for grants and contracted technical services funded by the Division of Ecological Restoration (DER). The goal in almost every case included restoring habitat connectivity and flow to benefit fish species.

“River and wetland restoration projects improve habitat for many species of fish, such as brook trout, blueback herring, alewives, and rainbow smelt, that support recreational and commercial fisheries,” Ms. Griffin said of the designations.

The list included a partnership with the Sheriff’s Meadow Foundation to restore connectivity to the headwaters of Mill Brook by removing an earthen dam on the Roth Woodlands Property in Chilmark. It is the type of small-scale project that could prove meaningful in the future.

“We wish to be the best possible stewards of the section of Mill Brook that we own,” Sheriff’s Meadow executive director Adam Moore said. “In the case of Roth Woodlands, the Mill Brook flows beneath Old Farm Road through two culverts which are too small and too high. These culverts impede fish passage and create an artificial pond in which the temperatures are too high for fish to survive. We hope to restore the stream channel by putting in a proper culvert, and we believe that this will benefit native brook trout and the brook lamprey. We are very grateful to the Commonwealth for its financial and technical assistance.”

This map shows the various dams and impoundments that impede the flow of Mill Brook.
This map shows the various dams and impoundments that impede the flow of Mill Brook.

The September/October issue of American Angler magazine included an article by Morgan Lyle about the mounting effort to oppose a $5.19 billion hydroelectric project proposed by the government of Alaska. “An Alaskan proposal to dam the mighty Susitna River bucks the dam-demolishing trend in full swing from Maine to South America,” Mr. Lyle wrote.

The article described dam removal efforts in Maine and noted that the “freed Kennebec River now has the largest runs of alewives and blueback herring on the East Coast.”

Amy Kober of American Rivers, a nonprofit advocacy group, is quoted in the article. “When you take a dam down and let a river flow freely, the signs of life come back quickly, from insects to fish to osprey,” she said. “More than 1,100 dams have been removed in our country. On the Kennebec and Penobscot, on rivers across the country, the web of life is being repaired. And that’s good for anglers, it’s good for communities, it’s good for all of us who benefit from clean water and healthy rivers.”

I have to think it would also be good for West Tisbury.

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The discovery of this Hobie Cat near Tashmoo Friday night spurred an extensive search. Photo courtesy Coast Guard.

Updated 1 pm, Monday, Sept. 1

The search, Saturday morning, by air and sea for the owner of a catamaran found washed up on the beach late Friday near Lake Tashmoo on Vineyard Sound ended when the owner called the Coast Guard and explained that he was safe.

By the time the search came to an end at about noon on Saturday, boat crews from Station Woods Hole and Station Menemsha, the Coast Guard Cutters Ridley and Hammerhead and an HC-144a Ocean Sentry search aircraft from Air Station Cape Cod, as well as Coast Guard Auxiliary Aircraft aircrews, had taken part in a search for possible people in the water.

“A case like this illustrates why it’s extremely important for folks to document their vessels and make them easily identifiable,” Richard Elliott, the command duty officer at Sector Southeastern New England, said.

The search began when the caretaker for the Sawyer-Nichols property west of the Tashmoo opening found the sailboat just on the beach and called Tisbury police. The man was concerned because the sail was up, the rudder was down, and it did not appear as there had been any effort to pull the boat up on the beach, Sergeant Chris Habekost told The Times.

“There was no sign of anyone around and he was concerned that someone might be in the water,” Sergeant Habekost said.

Initially, watchstanders at Sector Southeastern New England received a call at about 10 pm, Friday from the Dukes County Communications Center that the unmarked 13-foot Hobie Cat Wave model was washed ashore with the sail up and the rudder down, Coast Guard officials said in a press release. It was reported to the Coast Guard that the Hobie Cat had “lines hanging and dirty footprints on the deck.”

In response, the Coast Guard initiated a search of the surrounding waters.

Tisbury assistant harbor master Jim Pringle said the Hobie Cat appeared as though someone had been out sailing and got knocked off the boat, causing it to just just sail up on the beach. The boat is normally anchored just off a beach house not far away, he later learned.

It was not until the owner, Peter Gray, of New York, a seasonal visitor staying in his family’s cottage not far from where the boat was found, called police to report his Hobie Cat was missing, that the mystery of the washed-up boat was solved.

Mr. Pringle said the Coast Guard invested a lot of resources in the search for “nothing.” He said the harbor department is constantly urging people to identify their small boats, including sailboats and dinghies, so owners can be speedily located in just this type of event.

Reached by phone for comment, Mr. Gray provided the following statement.

“I’d like to take this opportunity to sincerely apologize and express my humble gratitude to my neighbor David, Tisbury Police, the Tisbury Harbor Master, and, most importantly, the U.S. Coast Guard, Sector Southeastern New England, for their swift and comprehensive response to what might have been a far more tragic storyline. We are so lucky to live in this country where we enjoy such exceptional maritime safeguards. I’d like to try to draw some good from this incident by reiterating Officer Richard Elliott’s simple, critical message: clearly label all of your small craft with your name and cell phone. That small step on my part would have prevented this minor oversight from escalating into what it became.”

vessel-identification-sticker.JPGThe Vineyard chapter of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary provides free “If Found” labels, according to Chris Scott, Flotilla Commander, 11-2, D1NR. “We encourage owners of all small craft such as Hobies, sunfish, canoes, kayaks, dinghies, paddleboards, etc. to use them,” he said.

The labels are available at West Marine and the harbormaster’s office.

Will Wagner of Cambridge holds a 13.5 pound bluefish that he pulled out of the rocks while casting for bass near President Obama’s vacation house last week. Photo by Phil Cronin. — Photo by Phil Cronin

Fishermen like to complain when they are not catching fish. They complain about the fishing, the weather, the lack of bait, other fishermen, their spouses, their boss and global warming or global cooling.

Fishermen also practice the art of rationalization and they are nothing if not philosophical about their sport — in a bumper sticker sort of way: “A bad day of fishin’ beats a good day of working,” is a popular bit of fishing wisdom you will find affixed to rusting trucks and flashy SUVs.

Well, I’m here to tell you that it is not alway true. An Australian fisherman named Tran Van Lanh had a bad day of fishing and I bet he wishes he had stayed at work. You see, Tran got eaten by a croc. Honest.

On Martha’s Vineyard we don’t have to worry about crocs, or snakes or head hunters. We have it pretty good. Our biggest risk is hooking ourselves in front of our friends. A bad day of fishin’ on the Vineyard is no fish. Not so in Australia.

According to the Outdoor Hub news service, which provides me with a steady stream of news stories that make me happy to be on Lobsterville beach, the 57-year-old fishermen was killed last Monday after he was ambushed by a crocodile in Australia’s Adelaide River.

The partially albino croc, according to the Australian news service SBS, had a white head and was well known along the river as “Michael Jackson.” Guess the Australians didn’t get the memo, or maybe it is too far away for Al Sharpton to cause a fuss.

SBS reported, “The man was taken when he got into the water to unsnag his fishing line.”

Not a good idea to try and unsnag a line in a croc-infested river.

“Police and rangers scouring the crocodile-infested river by boat on Monday night shot and killed a 4.5 meter crocodile (that’s almost 15 feet) and the man’s body was recovered later that night.

“The Adelaide River is well known for its Jumping Croc tours, where boats travel the river and crocodiles jump for meat attached to hooks.

“Michael Jackson was one in a million, and unfortunately being an albino would have been picked on by all the others, it’s a big pecking order,” said Rob Marchand, owner of Wallaroo Tours, which runs Jumping Croc cruises across the river from where the man was taken, the news service reported.

I do not think Mr. Marchand is an objective expert. One-in-a-million? So the next 999,999,999 fishermen who jump in the river to unsnag lures should get out just fine?

Mr. Marchand said that the crocodile had been in that part of the river for several years, “and that the crocodiles had been fighting a lot recently, jockeying for position and preparing to breed.”

He added, “They [crocs] know how to do three major things: eat, reproduce and aggression … if you’re not going to look after yourself, you’ll find yourself being eaten.”

By the way, he rejected the suggestion that the Jumping Croc tours were encouraging predatory behaviour on the Adelaide River.

“I’m sure crocs knew how to eat people a long time before we come along,” he said.

So next time you’re complaining about a bad day fishin’, think of poor Tran and say a little prayer.

Striper hearings set

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), a 15-member body responsible for managing fish species and implementing management plans along the East Coast, is beginning the process of revising the regulations that govern striped bass. In government speak, the ASMFC will take comment on Addendum IV to the Striped Bass Management Plan. “The Draft Addendum proposes new fishing mortality (F) reference points, as recommended by the 2013 benchmark stock assessment, and associated management measures to reduce F to a level at or below the proposed target within one or three years. It responds to results of the 2013 Atlantic striped bass benchmark assessment indicating F in 2012 was above the proposed F target, and female spawning stock biomass (SSB) has been steadily declining below the target since 2006.”

Of course, F is pretty much what recreational fishermen on Martha’s Vineyard have been saying for years as they’ve watched the quality of the bass fishing decline.

The Draft Addendum includes a suite of management options to reduce recreational and commercial harvest along the coast and in the Chesapeake Bay. Specific options to be considered include bag, size, slot and trophy size limits for the recreational fishery and quota reductions for the commercial fishery.

The Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) will hold a series of hearings on behalf of the ASMFC the first week in September but does not plan to make state specific recommendations and hold hearings on them until later this year. One thing is certain: new rules will be in place when the bass return to Massachusetts next spring.

DMF is not planning to hold an ASMFC hearing on the Vineyard but will hold a hearing on Nantucket on Sept. 2. That makes no sense to me. Nantucket has a small commercial fishery, a much smaller number of recreational fishermen and is in the middle of the ocean.

Other hearing sites include: Massachusetts Maritime Academy (Sept. 2); Gloucester (Sept 3); and Braintree (Sept. 4).

Now is the time to comment. Yapping in the tackle shop means nothing. Public comment will be accepted until 5 pm, September 30, and should be forwarded to Mike Waine, Fishery Management Plan Coordinator, 1050 N. Highland St, Suite A-N, Arlington, VA 22201; 703-842-0741 (FAX) or at mwaine@asmfc.org  (Subject line: Draft Addendum IV). For more information, contact Mike Waine, at mwaine@asmfc.org or 703-842-0740.

Derby approaches

The 69th Martha’s Vineyard Striped Bass and Bluefish Derby (mvderby.com) is only weeks away. The Derby begins on Sept. 14 and ends October 18. More later.

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A victorious Civil War general, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the first Civil Rights Act.

President Ulysses S. Grant (seated, right) with his wife standing behind him. At left is General Babcock, his wife and niece; in center, Babcock's sister-in-law. The Bishop Haven Cottage on Clinton Ave. looks much the way it did when Grant visited, 140 years ago this summer. — Courtesy MV Museum

Martha’s Vineyard’s history is a rich narrative of people and events. In a regular series, The Times has invited the Martha’s Vineyard Museum to draw on its unique cache of contemporary photos and first-person accounts to describe interesting but often unfamiliar moments in Island history called to mind sometimes, but not always, by current dates or events. This latest installment draws from an article “When Grant Took the Island” by Arthur Railton in the Dukes County Intelligencer (vol. 29, no. 1, August 1987).

Four generations (and friends) at the Bishop Haven House, Clinton Ave., Oak Bluffs: Aven Porrini (standing, front); Aven's great grandmother, Barb Horlocker (seated, green shirt) and her friend Sue Keyser (pink shirt); standing back: neighbor Justin Rogers; Jackie Kaser (homeowner); her daughter Karley Kaser (Aven's mother); neighbor Paige O'Flaherty. The Kaser family has owned the Bishop Haven Cottage since 1954, when Karley Kaser's grandparents bought it for $3,000 and proceeded to pay the loan off in $20 monthly installments. Karley has been coming to the cottage every summer since she was born. Ms. O'Flaherty and Mr. Rogers are engaged and plan to be married on the porch of her parents' cottage — just across Clinton Ave. — on August 21.
Four generations (and friends) at the Bishop Haven House, Clinton Ave., Oak Bluffs: Aven Porrini (standing, front); Aven’s great grandmother, Barb Horlocker (seated, green shirt) and her friend Sue Keyser (pink shirt); standing back: neighbor Justin Rogers; Jackie Kaser (homeowner); her daughter Karley Kaser (Aven’s mother); neighbor Paige O’Flaherty. The Kaser family has owned the Bishop Haven Cottage since 1954, when Karley Kaser’s grandparents bought it for $3,000 and proceeded to pay the loan off in $20 monthly installments. Karley has been coming to the cottage every summer since she was born. Ms. O’Flaherty and Mr. Rogers are engaged and plan to be married on the porch of her parents’ cottage — just across Clinton Ave. — on August 21.

Well before the highly publicized visits to Martha’s Vineyard of President Barack Obama, and before him, President Bill Clinton, 140 years ago another visiting president created a wave of excitement that generated headlines across the country and put Oak Bluffs, then a little-known resort community, on the map.

Ulysses S. Grant rose from poverty and obscurity to become the commanding general of Union forces during the Civil War and secure the victories President Abraham Lincoln so desperately needed to keep the Union and his presidency intact. On March 4, 1869, Republican Grant was elected as the 18th president of the United States.

President Grant was adamant that recently freed slaves enjoy the same rights as all Americans. He used federal troops to protect “freedmen” from the Klu Klux Klan and supported the Fifteenth Amendment, which stipulated that no state shall deprive any citizen of the right to vote because of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” And on March 1, 1875, he signed the Civil Rights Act, described by historian H. W. Brands (“The Man Who Saved the Union, Ulysses Grant in War and Peace,” Doubleday, 2012) as “the most ambitious affirmation of racial equality in American history until then, a distinction it would retain until the 1960s.”

One year before he signed that landmark bill, President Grant visited Martha’s Vineyard where he enjoyed a fireworks display, Illumination Night and the adoration of thousands.

“It was nothing compared to the way he took Richmond, but when President Ulysses S. Grant visited Martha’s Vineyard for three days in 1874, he did, indeed, take it over,” Arthur Railton wrote in the his account of the president’s visit for the Dukes County Intelligencer. “Crowds numbering as many as 30,000 at times put on a stunning public display of affection for a President who, in the middle of his second term, was on the brink of a series of shocking scandals …

“The trip, which seems to have been planned in secret, probably had political motivation. Grant was being urged by some supporters to ignore the no-third-term tradition and run again in 1876. He seemed tempted to do so and his wife, Julia Dent, was eager that he run, as were some of his Cabinet.”

The New York Herald, in an editorial, suggested that President Grant might be trying to win over the Methodists, who “were congregating in Wesleyan Grove on Martha’s Vineyard for their annual camp meeting that August in 1874 and the President’s pastor, Rev. Dr. O. H. Tiffany of the Metropolitan Methodist Church in Washington, was there. It was he, the newspapers wrote, who had invited his famous parishioner to join him.”

A quiet bow

Although Mr. Grant did not have the luxury of speedy travel in a helicopter, he did get around, visiting Wellfleet, Hyannis, Nantucket, and Naushon over the course of his visit.

President Grant and his party traveled on a special three-car train placed at the disposal of the President by the Old Colony Railroad, which serviced Cape Cod. They also traveled on the steamer River Queen, an Island ferry since 1871.

“The River Queen docked at the Highland Wharf, which had been built in 1871 by the Methodists so they would not have to disembark at the Oak Bluffs Wharf and pass through the temptations offered in that ‘unholy’ summer resort. A horse-drawn trolley ran from the Highland Wharf directly into the Campground, delivering the faithful unsullied.

“Awaiting the President was a gaily decorated trolley car drawn by six gleaming black horses. The Vineyard Gazette described the arrival: ‘Immediately on arriving, the party entered one of the Vineyard Grove cars, drawn by six horses and appropriately decorated for the occasion, and, followed by a numerous concourse of carriages and pedestrians, proceeded to Clinton Avenue. On reaching that point, so great was the press, notwithstanding the five or six thousand who were congregated in and about the grandstand, that there was some difficulty in extracting the party from the cars; but they finally succeeded in effecting an escape into Bishop Haven’s cottage, where they might recruit a little before appearing to the people. . . . an immense bouquet composed wholly of the most elegant rosebuds and green attracting much attention. (Aug. 28, 1874).’”

Four generations (and friends) at the Bishop Haven House, Clinton Ave., Oak Bluffs: Aven Porrini (standing, front); Aven's great grandmother, Barb Horlocker (seated, green shirt) and her friend Sue Keyser (pink shirt); standing back: neighbor Justin Rogers; Jackie Kaser (homeowner); her daughter Karley Kaser (Aven's mother); neighbor Paige O'Flaherty. The Kaser family has owned the Bishop Haven Cottage since 1954, when Karley Kaser's grandparents bought it for $3,000 and proceeded to pay the loan off in $20 monthly installments. Karley has been coming to the cottage every summer since she was born. Ms. O'Flaherty and Mr. Rogers are engaged and plan to be married on the porch of her parents' cottage — just across Clinton Ave. — on August 21.
Four generations (and friends) at the Bishop Haven House, Clinton Ave., Oak Bluffs: Aven Porrini (standing, front); Aven’s great grandmother, Barb Horlocker (seated, green shirt) and her friend Sue Keyser (pink shirt); standing back: neighbor Justin Rogers; Jackie Kaser (homeowner); her daughter Karley Kaser (Aven’s mother); neighbor Paige O’Flaherty. The Kaser family has owned the Bishop Haven Cottage since 1954, when Karley Kaser’s grandparents bought it for $3,000 and proceeded to pay the loan off in $20 monthly installments. Karley has been coming to the cottage every summer since she was born. Ms. O’Flaherty and Mr. Rogers are engaged and plan to be married on the porch of her parents’ cottage — just across Clinton Ave. — on August 21.

“The Grants were given a half hour’s respite before being escorted on foot the one hundred yards or so to the Tabernacle, then a huge canvas tent, where thousands had assembled for the occasion. The regular afternoon services had been sparsely attended as most of the faithful had witnessed the President’s arrival. The regular evening service had been cancelled. The Methodist newspaper, Zion’s Herald, described the scene this way: ‘Even calm Presiding Elder Talbot flushed a little in the face, as he mounted the stand under the canopy and introduced the President of the United States, not to worshipping, but applauding thousands.’

“Grant did not speak after his introduction, instead, ‘as usual he responded with a quiet bow.’ The Vineyard Gazette gave a few more details of the occasion: ‘. . . the space under the canopy and for rods around was one dense mass of eager humanity, such as probably was never known here before. . . Amid a perfect burst of applause, the President was presented, bowing in response to the enthusiastic salutations of the multitude. . . After the singing of “America,” the party returned to Bishop Haven’s cottage. . . [where] the President again appeared a moment on the cottage balcony and then withdrew and was seen no more till six o’clock, when he dined at the Central House.’

“The Gazette reporter may have missed a good story. The New Bedford Mercury reported that after returning to the Haven cottage, the President slipped out to make a private and relaxing visit: ‘The President called at the cottage of Alderman J. H. Collins of Cambridge on Merrill Avenue, and indulging in a quiet smoke, under the admiring gaze of some 20 spectators. . . the crowd didn’t get wind of this movement, which was effected by a neat little bit of backdoor strategy.’”

On the map

“After dining at the Central House, the President and Mrs. Grant were driven around the Campground and, outside it, along the streets of Oak Bluffs to enjoy the Illumination, that display of Japanese lanterns which is today a Campground tradition. It had been introduced six years earlier by the Oak Bluffs Land and Wharf Company outside the Campground, but in recent years, it had spread to Clinton Avenue, within the hallowed area.”

On his last night on the Vineyard, President Grant was the guest of honor at a supper hosted by J. W. Harper of the publishing house, Harper Brothers of New York. “The affair was held at the famed Sea View Hotel, the newest and finest hotel in Oak Bluffs, overlooking Nantucket Sound. It was, no doubt, an elegant affair.”

The following account reveals that in some aspects, presidential visits have not much changed.

“After the supper, another reception followed, this one given in Grant’s honor by Holder M. Brownell, manager and later owner of the Sea View Hotel. It was described vividly by the reporter from the New York Herald: ‘. . . [present were] several hundred ladies and gentlemen, the latter appearing in full dress and the fair sex in the choicest and most elegant toilets which a refined taste or a craving desire for display could possibly conceive. . . those who were not favored with cards of invitation contenting themselves by crowding the corridors and piazzas of the mammoth hotel and peeping through the windows for a glance at the Executive lion. There were thousands of these coming and going all the evening and the scenes outside were scarcely less enlivening and brilliant than those inside. The rustic policemen who were on duty found their authority was not respected and early in the evening they surrendered to the multitude. . . probably not less than a thousand ladies and gentlemen were presented to the President ….’”

Mr. Railton said that the Methodist clergy left the reception about the same time as the President because right after Grant’s departure, “the guests began what was called the ‘hop,’ with dancing going on until after midnight.

“It was, without doubt, the Sea View’s finest hour. It was much more than that: it was overwhelming proof that Oak Bluffs had made it into the big time as a summer resort. Laudatory articles appeared in the major newspapers of the country each day describing the Presidential visit and most mentioned the physical charm of the Vineyard. The weather was superb during the entire three days and the reports praised the loveliness of this delightful seaside paradise. In a year of economic depression, such publicity must have buoyed the spirits of the directors of the Oak Bluffs Land and Wharf Company who were having some difficulty selling their building lots. The Presidential visit had put Oak Bluffs on the front pages of America and they began to dream of replacing Newport as the East Coast’s finest summer resort.”

The following day, Sunday, the Big Sunday of Camp Meeting, as the final day was traditionally called, President and Mrs. Grant attended the morning service and then boarded the Monohansett, bound for New Bedford. The President said nothing upon departing.

“He bowed slightly, waved to the crowd, and with Julia on his arm walked up the gangplank. The steamer pulled away, the crowd dispersed and life on the Vineyard returned to normal.”

 

Highlights of President Grant’s Civil Rights Efforts

Following an unrelenting spate of violence against freed slaves and Republicans, Grant explained his use of federal authority to enforce the law in the southern states and argued for Civil rights legislation:

“To the extent that Congress has conferred power upon me to prevent it, neither Ku Klux Klans, White Leagues, nor any other association using arms and violence to execute their unlawful purposes can be permitted in that way to govern any part of this country; nor can I see with indifference Union men or Republicans ostracized, persecuted, and murdered on account of their opinions, as they now are in some localities. I now earnestly ask that such action be taken by Congress as to leave my duties perfectly clear.”

President Grant commented after he signed “An Act to Enforce the Provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment,” also known as the Klu Klux Klan Act:

“It is my earnest wish that peace and cheerful obedience to law may prevail throughout the land and that all traces of our late unhappy civil strife may be speedily removed. These ends can be easily reached by acquiescence in the results of the conflict, now written in our Constitution, and by the due and proper enforcement of equal, just, and impartial laws in every part of our country.”

President Grant reached out to the North and South in his first inaugural address:

“The country having just emerged from a great rebellion, many questions will come before it for settlement in the next four years which preceding administrations have never had to deal with. In meeting these it is desirable that they should be approached calmly, without prejudice, hate, or sectional pride, remembering that the greatest good to the greatest number is the object to be attained.”

As a general and president, Grant was a man of few words and used the following speech often:

I rise only to say that I do not intend to say anything. I thank you for your hearty welcomes and good cheers.”

General Grant on war:

The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.”

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President Barack Obama spoke about the murder of journalist James Foley during a press briefing at the Edgartown School Wednesday. — ©Rick Friedman

President Barack Obama returned to his Martha’s Vineyard vacation schedule and the golf course Wednesday following a two-day break for a return to the White House and a series of meetings and conference calls Sunday and Monday concerning national and international events, including the situation in Ferguson, Mo., and the latest developments in Iraq and the economy.

Mr. Obama’s first full day back began on a somber note. In a brief statement from the Edgartown School cafeteria, President Obama, tieless but wearing a blue jacket and accompanied by deputy press secretary Eric Schultz, stepped to a podium and delivered remarks on the murder of journalist Jim Foley, 40, by terrorists.

A video posted online yesterday appeared to show a militant dressed in black beheading Mr. Foley.

“The entire world is appalled by the brutal murder of Jim Foley by the terrorist group ISIL,” Mr. Obama said in his remarks. “Jim was a journalist, a son, a brother, and a friend. He reported from difficult and dangerous places, bearing witness to the lives of people a world away. He was taken hostage nearly two years ago in Syria, and he was courageously reporting at the time on the conflict there.”

Mr. Obama said that he had spoken earlier in the day to Mr. Foley’s family and told them that “we are all heartbroken at their loss, and join them in honoring Jim and all that he did.”

Turning to the subject of the terrorists, Mr. Obama said, “Jim Foley’s life stands in stark contrast to his killers. Let’s be clear about ISIL. They have rampaged across cities and villages — killing innocent, unarmed civilians in cowardly acts of violence. They abduct women and children, and subject them to torture and rape and slavery. They have murdered Muslims — both Sunni and Shia — by the thousands. They target Christians and religious minorities, driving them from their homes, murdering them when they can for no other reason than they practice a different religion. They declared their ambition to commit genocide against an ancient people.

“So ISIL speaks for no religion. Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents. No just God would stand for what they did yesterday, and for what they do every single day. ISIL has no ideology of any value to human beings. Their ideology is bankrupt. They may claim out of expediency that they are at war with the United States or the West, but the fact is they terrorize their neighbors and offer them nothing but an endless slavery to their empty vision, and the collapse of any definition of civilized behavior.”

President Obama said ISIL would ultimately fail “because the future is won by those who build and not destroy, and the world is shaped by people like Jim Foley, and the overwhelming majority of humanity who are appalled by those who killed him.”

He promised that the United States “will continue to do what we must do to protect our people. We will be vigilant and we will be relentless. When people harm Americans, anywhere, we do what’s necessary to see that justice is done. And we act against ISIL, standing alongside others.”

Mr. Obama ended his remarks by saying that the country mourns the loss of Jim Foley. “May God bless and keep Jim’s memory, and may God bless the United States of America,” he said. He then turned quietly and walked out of the room

Afterward, the motorcade drove to the Vineyard Golf Club where he has played once before on this vacation. His golfing companions were retired basketball player Alonzo Mourning‎, businessman Glenn Hutchins, and Valerie Jarrett family member Cyrus Walker‎, according to the White House.

Mr. Obama and his family are expected to maintain their-low key schedule of dinner with friends, family activities and golf.

In the past week he and Michelle Obama have dined at State Road restaurant in West Tisbury, Atria in Edgartown and the Sweet Life Cafe in Oak Bluffs. In the past, President Obama and his family have attended the Oak Bluffs fireworks and, without the president, the Ag Fair.

President Barack Obama and daughter Malia ride through the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest in West Tisbury, Mass, on August 15, 2014. The President was joined by First Lady Michelle Obama.
President Barack Obama and daughter Malia ride through the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest in West Tisbury on Friday. The President was joined by First Lady Michelle Obama.

Last Friday, on another gorgeous Martha’s Vineyard summer day, President and Ms. Obama and their daughter, Malia, behaved like any other vacationing family — the difference being a train of SUVs, reporters and Secret Service agents — and went for a bike ride in the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest.

The traveling press pool traveled by van a few miles to a scenic spot on the bike path and waited for a fleeting glimpse of the bicycle-riding first family. Mr. Obama, the first lady, and Malia passed by, pedaling at a leisurely pace. “Hey guys, nice day, huh?” Mr. Obama said to the pool.

All three were decked out in athletic wear, with Ms. Obama in gray spandex capri pants and a short-sleeved top. Malia wore running shorts and a black tee-shirt.

The president wore a black athletic shirt, dark gray pants, white socks, and black Nikes. All three wore bike helmets. A phalanx of Secret Service agents followed closely behind.

The press pool saw the first family for only seconds as they made their way down the path.

President Obama’s motorcade departed at 12:33 pm, a little less than an hour after arriving at the bike path.

Ten minutes later, the president arrived at Farm Neck Golf Club, his third trip to the popular Oak Bluffs course since his arrival on August 9. His golf partners that day, according to the White House, were Mr. Hutchins, Mr. Walker, and Robert Wolf.

President Obama is scheduled to depart the Island this Sunday, August 24.

Matt and Alicia Winter in Coop’s last week shopping for a third Mojo rod. — Nelson Sigelman

Fishermen believe in mojo. Tides, fresh bait, the hottest lure, the best fly mean nothing if a fisherman does not have mojo. Look no further than the annual Martha’s Vineyard Striped Bass and Bluefish Derby for evidence.

Experienced Derby fishermen go to such great pains every year to register under the same number that the tackle shop outlets keep lists of “reserved” buttons. There are lucky rods and lucky lures. But on any given day mojo is what makes the difference. That and a good fishing rod.

St. Croix makes some of the finest quality fishing rods around. The company’s Mojo Surf rod is light and tough and named to inspire confidence. But what happens when you start to believe in bad mojo?

I was standing in Coop’s when Matt and Alicia Winter, longtime West Tisbury seasonal visitors from Kent, Conn., walked in and began inspecting fishing rods. Alicia picked up an 8-foot Mojo. “I love this rod but I’m starting to think it’s bad luck,” Alicia said to Justin Pribanic, who was manning the store while Coop was off tuna fishing. What fishing columnist could resist that opening?

In this earlier photo, Alicia Winter holds a brace of bass she caught when her rod was intact.
In this earlier photo, Alicia Winter holds a brace of bass she caught when her rod was intact.

Alicia, Matt, and their son, Nathan, visit their family’s home every spring and fall to fish. Last October, they walked into Coop’s looking for a rod they could use for bass and other species. The 8-foot Mojo, matched with a Penn Battle 4,000 reel, was perfect. They each bought a new rod.

It was the last day of Columbus Day weekend. They had been fishing on the beach and were tired. “We leaned the rods against the truck, which we never do,” Matt said. “Neither one of us thought anything. We drove away and ran over them. It was awful.”

Two rods were destroyed, including Alicia’s new Mojo.

They returned to the Vineyard in May and again in June. Alicia had bought a new Mojo. They were excited to be on Island during the spring squid run along Bend-in-the-Road Beach in Edgartown.

They went to State Beach. Matt was with Nathan, 13, who was jigging for squid. Alicia threw out some frozen squid on a bottom rig and set her rod in a sand spike. “I walked over to talk to her for a minute, maybe half a minute,” Matt said. With their attention diverted they were not looking at the rod.

“The rod holder was just lying on the sand  and there was a groove in the sand leading to the water,” Matt said. “Alicia was really sad.”

Not only had she lost her new rod, but she had also very likely lost a very big striped bass. As Matt was retelling the story, Alicia was outside the shop testing the feel of another 8-foot Mojo. She admitted it was a very “cool” looking rod, but she could not shake the notion that in her hands it might just be bad luck.

Unwilling to succumb to bad mojo, Alicia bought the Mojo. Third time’s the charm!

Author talk

Author Michael J. Tougias seems to have found his niche in retelling the gripping details of disaster and rescue at sea. The common threads in the books I have read are weather, Coast Guard heroism, and decision-making, underpinned in some cases by personal courage and in others, characterized by miscalculations.

I met Michael several years ago when he spoke at the Vineyard Haven library about his most recently completed book, “Ten Hours Until Dawn.” The book tells the story of survival, heroism and disaster at sea story during the Blizzard of 1978 when the tanker Global Hope floundered on the shoals in Salem Sound off the Massachusetts coast. The Coast Guard heard the Mayday calls and immediately dispatched a patrol boat. Within an hour, the Coast Guard boat was in as much trouble as the tanker, having lost its radar, depth finder, and engine power in horrendous seas. Pilot boat Captain Frank Quirk was monitoring the Coast Guard’s efforts by radio, and when he heard that the patrol boat was in jeopardy, he and his crew of four went out in their 49-foot steel boat, the Can Do, to assist the Coast Guard.

Bounty Cover 2His latest book, which he co-authored with Douglas Campbell, is “Rescue of the Bounty, Disaster and Survival in Superstorm Sandy.”

The tall ship Bounty, featured in the Marlon Brando movie “Mutiny on the Bounty,” sank during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The captain and a crewmember died in the accident, but the Coast Guard performed harrowing helicopter rescues to save the other 14 sailors.

“The story begins on October 25, 2012 when Captain Robin Walbridge made the fateful decision to sail the HMS Bounty from New London, Connecticut, to St. Petersburg, Florida. Walbridge was well aware that a hurricane was forecast to come up the Eastern seaboard. He explained to his crew of 15 that the ship would fare better at sea than at port, and that he thought he could sail ‘around the hurricane.’ He told the crew that anyone who did not want to come on the voyage could leave the ship and there would be no hard feelings. No one took the captain up on his offer, and this decision would have fatal consequences.”

Michael will speak at the Vineyard Haven library at 7 pm on Tuesday about “Rescue of the Bounty.” He will speak at 6:30 pm on Thursday night at the Oak Bluffs library about “Ten Hours Until Dawn.”

Michael’s slide presentations and dramatic accounts make for a great night out for anyone with an interest in the sea and the heroism of those who risk their lives to save others. A book signing will follow the program, and the presentation is suitable for all ages.

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A perfect day for a bike ride in the State Forest.

President Barack Obama and daughter Malia ride through the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest in what would be a rare public sighting. (Ivy Ashe for the Vineyard Gazette) — Ivy Ashe for the Vineyard Gazette

On another gorgeous Martha’s Vineyard summer day, President Obama, Michelle and daughter Malia behaved like any other vacationing family — the difference being a train of SUVs, reporters and Secret Service agents —  and went for a bike ride in the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest.

President Barack Obama rides through the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest.
President Barack Obama rides through the Manuel F. Correllus State Forest.

President Obama departed his vacation home in Chilmark at 11:18 am for West Tisbury, according to pool press reports. The motorcade arrived at a bike path in West Tisbury at 11:38 am and the Obamas and their security contingent pedaled away.

The traveling press pool traveled by van a few miles to a scenic spot on the bike path and waited for a fleeting sighting of the bicycle-riding Obama family. Mr. Obama, the First Lady and Malia passed by, pedaling at a leisurely pace. “Hey guys, nice day, huh?” Mr. Obama said to the pool.

All three were decked out in athletic wear, with Michelle Obama in gray spandex capri pants and a short-sleeved top. Malia wore running shorts and a black T-shirt.

The president wore a black athletic shirt, dark gray pants, white socks and black Nikes. All donned bike helmets. A phalanx of Secret Service agents followed closely behind.

The press pool saw the president and family for only seconds as they continued to make their way down the path.

President Obama’s motorcade departed at 12:33 pm, a little less than an hour after arriving at the bike path.

First Lady Michelle Obama.
First Lady Michelle Obama.

Ten minutes later, the president arrived at Farm Neck Golf Club, his third trip since Saturday to the popular Oak Bluffs Course. Today’s golf partners, according to the White House are: Glenn Hutchins, Cyrus Walker and Robert Wolf.

The State Forest was created in 1908 in an effort to save a dwindling population population of heath hens. Only 45 remained on Earth at the time. The State Forest has since expanded to 5,343 acres and the heath hen is extinct.

 

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Chris Casey of Bristol, Vermont, soon to be a resident of Montana, caught a striped bass during an early morning fishing trip Friday with his brother, Ned Casey, of Edgartown. — By Ned Casey

I love to catch blue crabs. It is great fun. They are also delicious to eat, once you master the art of peeling open a crab to get at its sweet meat.

Several years ago, male crabs, known as jimmies, were easily found in many of the Island ponds. An afternoon of wading with a net was a sure way to harvest a limit of 25 crabs, more than enough for a feast. Last year and the year before that, it was tough to find big crabs.

Female crabs, identified by their red-tipped claws, were more plentiful. State regulations require that female egg-bearing crabs be thrown back. Common sense dictates that all females be released.

From what I hear from other crabbers, we are in for another difficult year. Edgartown and Tisbury Great Ponds do not appear to have many blue crabs. The scarcity may be related to our cold winter and an extended period of ice over of our ponds. Or it could be another indicator of declining water quality. There has been little study, as far as I know, of the blue claw in our ponds.

The Chesapeake Bay, the wellspring of blue crabs and the culture that surrounds these “Beautiful swimmers” is in trouble, according to Angus Phillips, who wrote an interesting opinion piece published July 25 in The Washington Post (“The Chesapeake Bay’s blue crab needs our help now, or never”).

Two years ago, a crab fisherman could pretty much bank on gathering a bushel within a few hours of leaving the dock, Mr. Phillips said.

“That was the norm, from June to September, as it had been for the decade or more since I took up crabbing and for a century before that,” he said. “Sometimes it was more than a bushel, sometimes less, but always there was a proper mess for supper if you took the trouble to go out.”

Last year, he said, the bottom fell out. Crabbers were not seeing small crabs or females and wondered what 2014 would bring.

“The answer is now in hand: Nothing. No crabs. The last signature species of the Chesapeake to withstand the pressures of overexploitation and declining habitat has all but disappeared from the waters around Annapolis, which locals still affectionately call Crabtown. Reports from elsewhere are no better. Like oysters, shad, herring, rockfish [striped bass] and yellow perch,crabs have vanished.”

Mr. Phillips argues that the time has come to shut down the crab fishery for a few years and give “the delectable crustaceans a chance to recover the way geese, yellow perch and rockfish did … The life cycle is short and their reproductive capacity so vigorous that we could have abundances back within a year or two, if we just leave them alone.”

Mr. Phillips called for immediate action.

“We have all watched critical Chesapeake resources dwindle to nothing, victims of declining habitat and ever more efficient methods of exploitation. At some point, these resources either go away or somebody puts up a hand and says: Stop! With blue crabs, that time is now — or never.”

The comments his opinion piece generated echo similar battles. Name your fishery. Not surprisingly, there is plenty of finger pointing. The commercial fishermen blame the recreational fishermen, the recreational fishermen blame the commercial fishermen, and both sides blame decreased water quality. Meanwhile, regulatory action lags.

A commentor identified as Southeast Creek said, “As a business person who has been in the crab business for 18+ years, I find your take on the situation ridiculously recreational. How about we place a ban on the hundreds of thousands of recreational crabbers who habitually catch more than their allotted 1 bushel limit? Happens over here on the Eastern Shore all the time.”

I saw one post under another report on the shortage of crabs in which the writer suggested the problem was an abundance of rockfish eating small crabs. He recommended an increase in the harvest of striped bass — now that is solid thinking.

I spoke by telephone last week with Chris Moore, Virginia senior scientist for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, a nonprofit group working to protect this vitally important natural system. I was curious why commercial crabbers are allowed to take females and I wondered if there was a link between the decline in the Chesapeake and the Vineyard.

Chris said that surveys have shown a significant drop in the crab population in Maryland and Virginia for the past three years. Coastwide the numbers are down as well, he said.

“And that’s not necessarily surprising,” he said. “There are good years for reproduction and poor years for reproduction. The crabs here in Chesapeake Bay, once they spawn go 50 miles out in the ocean and migrate back in. So there could be something going on with the ocean temperatures or currents the last three years that have lowered the success of spawning activity.”

Chris said there are known factors, including water quality and interrelated loss of eel grass. “We have eelgrass losses in Chesapeake Bay that are very prominent and that’s one of the best habitats for blue crabs. So as young blue crabs migrate back into Chesapeake Bay they don’t have that type of habitat to go hide in like they should.”

I noted that a similar loss of eelgrass in Martha’s Vineyard waters figures large in the health of the our once abundant bay scallop population.

Chris said he did not think the Chesapeake blue crab decline would necessarily impact the Vineyard. Crab populations are typically geographically localized, he said, and tied to estuary systems. They are not a species like striped bass, he said, that migrates long distances.

The males prefer less salinity. The females tend to congregate nearer the ocean.

It is entirely possible that we have a small but sustaining population.

Shellfish get most of the attention on the Vineyard. Blue crabs add another reason to work to sustain the health of our ponds.

Like to eat crab? Hold back on the fertilizer. Green grass is not even good for salad.

Striped bass revisions coming

Last week, I received a press release from the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC). Guess what? The scientists have come to the conclusion that most Island fishermen have already reached. Striped bass stocks are declining. According to ASMFC assessments, overfishing is not occurring yet but could in the future. Gee, how about that.

The history of fisheries management is pretty much the history of closing the barn door after the horses are out. Let’s hope it is not too late

This is what the ASMFC said about its new proposal, known as Draft Addendum IV to Amendment 6 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Striped Bass: “The Draft Addendum responds to results of the 2013 Atlantic striped bass benchmark assessment indicating F (fishing mortality) in 2012 was above the proposed F target, and female spawning stock biomass (SSB) has been steadily declining below the target since 2006. This means even though the stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, SSB is approaching its overfished threshold and stock projections show SSB will likely fall below the threshold in the coming years. In addition, a similar decline has been observed in total harvest.  In response to these factors, the Draft Addendum proposes management options to reduce fishing mortality to the target level.

“The Draft Addendum includes a suite of management options to reduce recreational and commercial harvest along the coast and in the Chesapeake Bay under three reduction timeframes. The timeframes include (1) reducing F to its target in one year with a 25 percent reduction in 2013 harvest in 2015 (2) reducing F to its target within three years with a 17 percent reduction in 2013 harvest in 2015, and (3) reducing F to its target within three years with a 7 percent sequential reduction in harvest for three consecutive years starting in 2015.  Specific options to be considered include bag, size, slot and trophy size limits for the recreational fishery and quota reductions for the commercial fishery.”

More later.

Reeling against the drag and other hazards of boat fishing chronicled.

Michael Faber from Memphis, TN with a Vineyard bonito caught Monday out fishing with charter captain Phil Cronin. — Photo by Phil Cronin

There is a common misperception that charter captains “get paid to go fishing.”

That is not true. They get paid not to lose their minds, or in extreme cases, kill their clients.

I am not a charter captain. I have no plans to ever become one.

Twice last week, I had occasion to take people fishing in a boat. At the request of a friend, Saturday morning I took two of his visiting guests, a mother and her adult son, fishing on Vineyard Sound. I was not ambitious. My goal was to see them catch some fluke and sea bass.

The wind was stronger than predicted, as it almost always is, and the Sound was pretty choppy off Chilmark. We were drifting in about 90 feet of water. Another boat was perhaps 100 yards away. That was it.

Up the sound comes a guy full throttle in what appeared to be 32-foot cruiser. Did he make an arc around us? No. He went between us. And mom, a resident of Florida, yelled at him and made what we in the respectable writing trade refer to as “an obscene gesture.” Wow.

“Please don’t do that,” I said to her as calmly as I could. I learned long ago at Five Corners that you never know who you are shouting at.

She was justified, of course. But I knew she would go back to Florida, where I assume all boaters travel armed and an obscene gesture is considered a mild rebuke as opposed to opening fire, while I would be left to deal with the nitwit boater.

Inconsiderate boaters come with the territory. They power through a group of drifting fishermen — is there a big rush? They tie up the launch ramp or dock — why not load your boat before you are on the ramp or wash it down at home?

The fishing was slow, which surprised me. The big sea bass that seemed everywhere just a few weeks ago were scarce. With the seas getting rougher, I decided to call it a morning.

The next day, Sunday, I met my cousin’s son, his brother-in-law who was visiting from France, and his friend, at the Tisbury town dock at 7 am. I was still recovering from my previous outing, but I was determined to make good on an unfulfilled promise last summer to take the trio fishing.

They had driven from Worcester and hopped on the 6 am ferry from Woods Hole. They brought a cooler and expected to catch some fish. What they did not bring was the remotest idea of how to do it.

My Tashmoo-18 is adequate for three people but not four, so I borrowed my friend Tom’s boat. Given all the possibilities for disaster, I do not like to borrow boats. My immediate concern was not to sink Tom’s boat.

Off middle ground I rigged up three bottom rods and provided basic instruction — don’t lift the fish out of the water or it will shake out the hook (happened); lead the fish to the net with the rod (didn’t happen); lift the fish with the rod and don’t reel, reel, reel (didn’t happen, happen, happen).

My immediate concern was that one of the guys would hook a decent fish and lose his rod. We caught several fluke, one big enough to keep. I decided to liven up the action. I rigged up two spinning rods, one with a swimming plug and the other with a needle fish, and began to troll along the rip in search of bluefish. Within five minutes a blue hit the swimming plug. I reeled in the other rod and handed the rod to the Frenchman.

He immediately began to reel and reel for all he was worth. At the same time the fish pulled line off the reel. This is what is known in the business as reeling against the drag. Every crank of the handle puts another twist in the line. Enough twists and the line resembles a Slinky.

I tried coaching. “When the fish pulls stop reeling,” I said.

“Move the fish with the rod,” I said.

But the excitement had him in its grip: Crank, crank, crank. I could stand it no longer.

“Stop!” I yelled.

He froze. I could see slack in the line. “No, reel, keep reeling,” I shouted.

The bluefish was now close to the boat. I grabbed the net. The bluefish dove and surfaced again. Netting a fish requires a bit of choreography. The idea is to put pressure on the fish so it swims in the direction of the net.

My fisherman waved his rod tip and extended it over the side of the boat which kept the fish far enough from the side of the boat and my waiting net The fish went to and fro. My only chance was to grab the line and lead the fish to me. I had just taken hold of the line when the fish shook the hook. Gone.

“Did I do something wrong?” my Frenchman asked.

“Sometimes fish get away,” I said.

We would lose three more bluefish. Catch a few more fluke and sea bass. And on the way back to the dock one of the guys leaned over the side and puked. He claimed he was fine but he looked a little dazed.

I may have been frustrated, but my cousin said he and his friends had a great time. And that is what it is all about.

Kayakers unite

Martha’s Vineyard’s salt ponds and rocky indentations are tailor made for nosing around with a kayak. Matt Malowski of Oak Bluffs is the latest kayak convert. Matt wants to gauge how much interest there is in an informal M.V. kayak fishing club that would meet on a regular basis to talk fishing, share tips and get together for fishing trips. Interested fishermen should email Matt (matt@mvfishing.com). “I’ll create a list serve and begin coordinating an initial meeting to generate some ideas on how to proceed,” Matt said. “People will need to have their own kayaks and fishing gear. The hope is once we get a few people together we can start sharing ideas and knowledge, set dates and places to meet to go fishing together, and perhaps generate more interest for those who would like to learn more and get started in the adventure.”

For those who don’t want to share their email or don’t have one, Matt can be reached at 508-274-0320.

Fishing slobs

There is a small parking area off Beach Road that provides access to the culvert that connects Trapp’s Pond with Sengekontacket. I was there Sunday to look for blue crabs (pretty slim pickin’s). It appears people use the area to dump fish carcasses and shells. I also saw discarded bait that included eels, squid still in a plastic bag and other assorted trash. There is no excuse for dumping a baggie full of squid in the bushes. None.

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Catch a movie and maybe a fish on Menemsha Beach Tuesday.

A chart-topping 180-pound bigeye tuna brought it in late Saturday afternoon by the crew of Mulberry Canyon is hoisted up and weighed in. — Photo by Michael Cummo

Updated 3 pm, Friday with news of Cape Poge beach closure

By most accounts, The Oak Bluffs Bluewater Classic (OBBC) held last weekend went off without a hitch. No shark heads adorned boats, no protestors provided targets for beer cans and if there were arrests I did not hear about it. Pretty tame now after the Monster Shark tournament swam out of town.

Damon Sacco of Bourne, owner and operator of Castafari Sport Fishing and organizer of the Hyannis Tuna Fest, was the organizer of the first Bluewater classic. Ted Rosbeck of Edgartown helped out.

Participants on the boat Mulberry Canyon pose next to their 180-pound Big Eye Tuna after it topped the charts on Saturday.
Participants on the boat Mulberry Canyon pose next to their 180-pound Big Eye Tuna after it topped the charts on Saturday.

A total of 25 boats entered the contest. In an email, Mr. Sacco said the 2014 Oak Bluffs Bluewater Classic raised over $14,000 for charity. Proceeds went to the Island Autism Group and the MGH Colon Cancer Research Fund in memory of Kevin Glynn, he said.

Sixteen billfish — four blue marlin and 12 white marlin — were released. One bigeye tuna was landed, as were “a ton of yellowfin and mahi-mahi.”

Captain Al Gagnon of Brennans Grin took first place. Second place went to Captain Ted Rosbeck of Bad Martha. Captain John Galvin of Mulberry Canyon was third.

The biggest tuna was an 180-pound bigeye landed by Mulberry Canyon. Most billfish points went to the crew of Brennans Grin with two blue marlin. Mr. Sacco said there were 46 yellowfin tuna caught up to 95 pounds.

Steve Morris, owner of Dick’s Bait and Tackle in Oak Bluffs, participated in the tournament. Steve told me, “It was definitely a lot calmer. Not a lot of yahoos. The guys were nice and it seemed like they were just here to fish.”

The banquet was held at Dreamland. Everybody seemed to be really happy with it, Steve said.

Steve said offshore fishing is an addiction and he admitted he is “totally hooked.”

The tournament weigh in attracted a crowd of spectators to Oak Bluffs harbor.
The tournament weigh in attracted a crowd of spectators to Oak Bluffs harbor.

He explained, “You never know what’s going to be out there, a white marlin or a bigeye tuna, there’s so much out there to catch. We spent the night out there, we turned the lights on and there were squid and bait all around the boat. You just never know what’s going to be out there.”

I suggested it might also be scary to be a little boat in a very big, dark ocean far from land. Steve laughed. “This is true, this is true, that’s why you go in a big boat.”

Steve said they put the lines out Friday night to try and catch a swordfish. Crewmembers took turns sleeping. “There’s usually someone up tending the rods,” Steve said.

“And looking out for a Korean oil tanker?” I asked.

“Well you stay out of their way, for sure,” Steve said.

But they were not alone. They were part of a small fleet all hooked on offshore fishing. That is part of the fun, he said.

First bass of the summer

Matthew Strem of Edgartown holds a 15 pound striped bass he caught Friday night on his new fishing rod.
Matthew Strem of Edgartown holds a 15 pound striped bass he caught Friday night on his new fishing rod.

While the big boys were fishing offshore, Matthew Strem, 10, of Edgartown was trying out his new bass rod on South Beach with his mom and dad. On Friday night Matthew caught his first striped bass of the summer. It was 34.5 inches long and weighed in at 15 pounds.

His mother Lynn provided the details: “We drove on to the beach and used squid on his new bass fishing pole, bottom fishing. Matthew was the first one that night to catch a bass. He was so excited he couldn’t wait for dad to get the tape measure to see if it was a keeper. And it was, 34 inches long and weighed 15 pounds. It was also about 11 pm that night. He caught his fish and reeled it in all by himself, but I wasn’t surprised because Matthew has been fishing for a long time, catching many different fish. Nothing compares to the look on his face when that fish came ashore and it was a huge bass.”

Matthew did very well to land a bass on the beach in the surf. It is no easy task. It takes timing to ride the fish up on a wave. Better yet, he caught a bass. Most reports describe tough fishing for stripers from the shore. Congratulations.

Movie night on Menemsha

All fishermen should be concerned with the state of our oceans. On Tuesday night, fishermen will have an opportunity to learn just how concerned they ought to be — and go fishing.

Documentary filmmaker Bob Nixon, a seasonal resident of Chilmark, and Fisher Stevens have produced a new documentary, MISSION BLUE, which describes the life of oceanographer Sylvia Earle. The filmmakers will show their film at 8:30 pm, Tuesday on Menemsha Beach in conjunction with the Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival. The event is free.

Bring popcorn for the film and a fishing rod for later.

Dennis Harvey offered this description in a review for Variety Magazine: “A compelling human-interest hook and spectacular underwater photography are the highlights of Fisher Stevens and Robert Nixon’s documentary.”

Mr. Harvey said, “The majesty and imperiled status of the world’s aquatic life are vividly captured in “Mission Blue.” Fisher Stevens and Robert Nixon’s documentary also serves as a biographical portrait of internationally renowned oceanographer and eco-activist Sylvia Earle, whose trailblazing career and inspiring ongoing efforts provide compelling human interest, while Bryce Groark’s spectacular underwater photography offers eye candy aplenty.”

Cape Poge beach closure

Cape Poge Wildlife Refuge is currently closed for over sand vehicle access from the Dike Bridge to the gut, Chris Kennedy, Trustees superintendent said Friday. “On Tuesday, two plover chicks moved from the outside beach, north of the Dike Bridge to the bayside trail to feed,” Chris said in an email Friday.  “The next day they moved back to the outside beach but now appear likely to continue moving back and forth between the narrows and East Beach. These chicks are due to fledge in two weeks but under state and federal law we will be required to keep all of Cape Poge closed until these chicks fledge. We encourage property users to call the 24 hour recorded beach hotline at 508-627-8390 for updated information. All of Leland Beach and Norton Point Beach are open for OSV access. Permits are required.”