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Oak Bluffs Police are searching for the driver of a car that hit a woman at this County Road crosswalk on Wednesday evening. – Photo by Steve Myrick.

Oak Bluffs police are asking for help in identifying the driver of a vehicle that struck a pedestrian Wednesday night near the Tradewinds airfield on County Road.

A 28-year-old woman got off a school bus at 9:46 pm, and was struck as she crossed County Road in the crosswalk. Police said the vehicle, possibly a van, was traveling outbound, or south, on County Road with headlights off. Police are reviewing surveillance video from the school bus.

The woman, whom police did not identify, was injured but she managed to crawl to her nearby home, where a family member was able to take her to Martha’s Vineyard Hospital. Police said she was treated for non-life threatening injuries.

Police asked anyone with information to contact the department at 508-693-0750, or send a message on the Oak Bluffs Police Facebook page.

While waiting to leave the Island recently I decided to fly my GoPro and quadcopter duo around Vineyard Haven harbor. I originally just wanted to capture the beauty of the harbor, but the video ended up being more about the docking of The Steamship Authority ferry Martha’s Vineyard and the freight boat Governor.  With my integrated first-person viewer system (FPV), I can see everything (standing on land) the GoPro sees as it flies around above me. I was quickly able to tell that the ferry was entering the harbor and followed it in, at a distance, as it docked.

It was very interesting to see this docking maneuver from the air because I have experienced it many times on the ferry. What started as waiting in line turned into a great little glimpse into what actually goes on at the Steamship Authority every day.

Carl Treyz, a lifelong Chappaquiddick summer resident, is a dental assistant in the process of applying to dental school. He’s also one of the founders of the EnTidaled project, which strives to connect people to conservation and sustainability efforts around the world, using engaging photos, stories, and short films. For more info on EnTidaled:entidaledproject.org. Carl Treyz last shared a quadcopter video with us in September, with his “Over Chappy” film. That can be seen at: http://www.mvtimes.com/2014/09/10/chappy/.

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Artist, Rex Williams, stands between two of his pieces "English Lit" and "No Mass Communications." —Photo by Siobhan Beasley

From paintings, photos, and sculpture to jewelry, feathers, plants, and storytelling, the Personal Altars II show at Featherstone Center for the Arts is an eclectic mélange of heartfelt inventiveness.

“We got a good mix for sure,” Veronica Modini, an assistant at the gallery, said.

Ms. Modini said this show was inspired by the first Art of the Personal Altar in 2011. Unlike that earlier exhibit, this version is much more varied. Though the show fills only a single room, there is more than enough to keep viewers engaged.

Several intriguing and personal installations and collections are displayed. Patrons at Sunday’s opening lingered before them, interpreting and analyzing, or chatting with their creators to learn the story behind the assemblages.

Minor Knight packed a corner with a display as exuberant as the artist and fashion designer herself. A giant succulent overflows its ornate planter, a painted screen, and behind, fabric-covered lamps. Above hangs a fanciful canopy of bright cloth strips, with a photo of Mick Jagger.

Minor Knight, "Chez Moi" Mixed Media, NFS. —Photo by Siobhan Beasley
Minor Knight, “Chez Moi” Mixed Media, NFS. —Photo by Siobhan Beasley

“The eye has to travel,” said Ms. Knight, quoting celebrated fashion icon Diana Vreeland. “It’s important to feed your spirit by being surrounded by things that inspire you.”

“Expressing gratitude for the natural world and our interaction with it” was Giulia Fleishman’s goal in creating an array of her favorite things — feathers, straw flowers, coarse green yarn, a basket her great grandmother made, even a mummified starling found in her fireplace.

Mary Thomson’s “Spring Shrine” echoes her jewelry maker’s craft with beads, shiny strips, and tiny images in a wooden shadow box.

In “Nature-Nurture,” seaweed artist Kathy Poehler combined coral, a fossil, a jawbone, a wildflower book, and more to recall meaningful moments in a tribute to her father.

Ceramicist John Robert Hill displays personal items from gold-bordered formal religious icons to faded photos, a shiny paper angel, a diving porcelain mermaid, a little whale figurine, all on an antique étagère. A vintage Diana Ross poster tops the mix.

Many of the 15 contributors chose very different forms of expression. Ms. Modini said that artists were invited to submit items or collections “that represented something of importance to them — anything that was meaningful and special, if they wanted to convey a certain feeling or message.”

Visitors are greeted by Chetta Kelley’s arresting “Balance,” an oil painting in lush, deep tones of gold, brown, red, and rust. In this otherworldly scene, slender forms approach a massive, round rock that seems to teeter on the edge of a cliff. Pilgrims in Burma visit this rock, believed to be steadied only by a hair of the Buddha, Ms. Kelley said. Her scene suggests the fragility of life, how fate can be changed by something as small as a single hair.

Mary French shared a seascape, a sailboat diminutive beneath the wide blue sky with racing clouds, a place she had enjoyed with her husband. In her mixed-media monotype with linear shapes and warm hues, Wendy Weldon recalls a garage from her childhood whose memory has endured.

Harry Seymour’s painting “Haitian Rosary” is meditative and serene, a dark-faced man intently clutching beads, the cross gleaming front and center.

Rick Brown’s photo in a handmade wooden frame titled “Wellspring” shows a sailboat he built, covered by an open work shed.

“Soil Magician,” a captivating audio-visual portrait of legendary Edgartown gardener Paul Jackson by Alan Brigish and Susan Klein, drew admiring visitors to a computer monitor. Ms. Klein’s carefully crafted narrative introduces the gardener, his family, history, wisdom, and dedication to the land.

Kathy Poehler stands next to her alter, dedicated to her father and their shared interests of honoring nature and nurturing the body, mind, and spirit "Nature-Nurture Body and Soul" —Photo by Siobhan Beasley
Kathy Poehler stands next to her alter, dedicated to her father and their shared interests of honoring nature and nurturing the body, mind, and spirit “Nature-Nurture Body and Soul” —Photo by Siobhan Beasley

Brilliant images by Mr. Brigish depict a year in the small but magically prolific Jackson garden. Snow gives way to fresh-tilled earth, green shoots emerge. Then harvest bounty is captured in fine, crisp detail: fresh-shelled peas, golden corn, greens, carrots, plump tomatoes.

Richard Dunstan Hamilton’s shimmering silver “Procrastination Chalice” stands starkly elegant, with details of Niobium, moonstone, a single amethyst. Explaining the title, Mr. Hamilton, a goldsmith, admitted he created the bowl in 1971. Slowly, the piece came together, incorporating other elements and stones, the base once part of a church’s chalice. His bejeweled “Soft Landing” rests perkily on three little legs like a silver mini-spaceship setting down, not surprising as Mr. Hamilton is a lifelong science fiction fan.

Rex Williams uses found objects in three quirky assemblages. One, “English Lit: dedicated to the librarians of Martha’s Vineyard,” aptly recycles typewriter parts — a roller, keys, a handle, with a scholarly-looking bust.

A herd of giraffes cavort delicately on black-painted spiral stairs. Only a few of writer Kate Hancock’s vast collection, they range from a well-worn plush giraffe to a willowy carved wood African one more than three feet tall, and several smaller renditions. Above hangs a photo, a giraffe with soulful eyes. Ms. Hancock, giraffe pendant around her neck, said her love for the gentle creatures began with a childhood gift, a giraffe on wheels once played with by her father. Now she owns more than 400, including gifts from school children she once taught.

Offering a feast of visual images and plenty of food for thought, the show continues through November 19.

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The U.S. Coast Guard Station Menemsha color guard, flanked by Island veterans, leads the parade to Ocean Park.

Flags waved in a crisp breeze under a cloudy sky Tuesday morning as Island veterans marched down Lake Avenue, to the applause of Islanders who lined the street, to Ocean Park for a ceremony that began at the 11th hour, on the 11th day of the 11th month, in commemoration of the time and date of the signing of the Armistice with Germany that ended World War I in 1918.

From left: Judy Williamson, Emma Williamson, Maggie Moffet and Peter Williamson lent their support.
From left: Judy Williamson, Emma Williamson, Maggie Moffet and Peter Williamson lent their support.

The marchers included Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, color guards from Coast Guard Station Menemsha and the Dukes County Sheriff’s Office, Oak Bluffs selectmen, a contingent of first responders from Oak Bluffs and Edgartown, State Police, and a representative from the Martha’s Vineyard Harley Riders. Family members and well-wishers gathered at the start of the short parade route at the head of Oak Bluffs harbor in front of Nancy’s restaurant for the start of the annual Veterans Day parade, one of hundreds of remembrances large and small across the country, to honor those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces.

At the end the short march, Peter Herrmann, a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 9261 and long-time parade organizer and host, called upon Lt. Col. David Berube, USAF, a chaplain in the National Guard Reserves and Oak Bluffs police officer, for an opening prayer.

“As we gather today, we remember our comrades who have been deployed throughout our country and around the world on behalf of our nation and our freedom,” Colonel Berube said. “Give to them and their families a sense of your peace, be with those who are prisoners or missing in action, and be with the families of the fallen, Lord.”

Emily Hewson, a student at Martha's Vineyard Regional High School, sang the National Anthem during the Veterans Day ceremony, as veteran Peter Herrmann saluted the flag.
Emily Hewson, a student at Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School, sang the National Anthem during the Veterans Day ceremony, as veteran Peter Herrmann saluted the flag.

Mr. Herrmann led everyone in the Pledge of Allegiance. Emily Hewson, a freshman at Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School, performed a solo of the National Anthem. Mr. Herrmann noted in his remarks that for the fourth year in a row, Oak Bluffs was designated a regional site for the observance of Veterans Day by the Veterans Day National Committee. He and Dukes County director of veterans services Jo Ann Murphy were responsible for submitting the application that led to Oak Bluffs being selected as one of 67 regional sites this year, and the only one in Massachusetts.

Mr. Herrmann introduced Ms. Murphy and noted her recent selection as the Massachusetts Veteran Service Officer of the Year by state Secretary of Veterans’ Services Coleman Nee, which brought applause from the crowd.

Dukes County director of Veterans Services Jo Ann Murphy delivered a Veterans Day message sent from U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald.
Dukes County director of Veterans Services Jo Ann Murphy delivered a Veterans Day message sent from U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald.

Ms. Murphy read a message from U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert A. McDonald sent for inclusion in the ceremony: “On Veterans’ Day, we pause to express our gratitude to those who have served our country, and to remember the sacrifices, large and small, physical and emotional, they have made. These individuals prioritized our country over themselves.

“We must continue to honor and provide them the benefits and services they have earned and deserve, no matter if those who wore a uniform never saw combat or never left U.S. soil. Each one is a veteran, and deserves to be honored, not only on Veterans Day but every day.”

Secretary McDonald also expressed appreciation for the support shown to the Veterans Administration by so many Americans, and offered special thanks to the Oak Bluffs Veterans Day regional site organizers.

“You recognize the bravery veterans have shown, and the many sacrifices they have made,” Mr. McDonald said. “We know we can rely on you to continue being an example of how all Americans should honor those who have defended our everyday freedom.”

Kristin Pucino-Gibson and her son, Aden ,laid a wreath at the Oak Bluffs World War I memorial in memory of her cousin, Staff Sergeant Matthew A. Pucino, who was killed in action in Afghanistan in 2009.
Kristin Pucino-Gibson and her son, Aden ,laid a wreath at the Oak Bluffs World War I memorial in memory of her cousin, Staff Sergeant Matthew A. Pucino, who was killed in action in Afghanistan in 2009.

Mr. Hermann invited Kristin Pucino-Gibson of Tisbury and her son Aden, 11, to place a wreath in front of the World War I memorial in memory of her cousin, Staff Sergeant (SSG) Matthew A. Pucino.

A member of the U.S. Army Special Forces’ Green Berets, SSG Pucino was killed in action on November 23, 2009, in Pashay Kala, Afghanistan. A gun salute followed the wreath-laying, in honor of soldiers who lost their lives during their service.

The ceremony concluded with “Taps,” played on the trumpet by American Legion Post 257 member Edson Rodgers, followed by a solo of “Amazing Grace” sung by Ms. Hewson.

Veteran Edson Rodgers played "Taps" at the conclusion of the Veterans Day ceremony.
Veteran Edson Rodgers played “Taps” at the conclusion of the Veterans Day ceremony.

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Vineyarders score in second overtime to win 2-1.

Alex GordonBeck (left), who scored the match-winning goal, and his jubilant Vineyard teammates celebrate the South Sectional semifinal win over top-seeded Medway Tuesday afternoon at Taunton High School. —Photo by Randi Baird

The Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School (MVRHS) varsity boys soccer team defeated the number one seed Medway High School Mustangs Tuesday afternoon 2-1 in a game that went down to the wire — twice. The winning goal came in the last minute of the second overtime on the Taunton High School field.

The Vineyarders, the fourth seed, now advance to the Division 3 South sectional final on Saturday when they face off against the Norwell Clippers, the seventh seed, at 2:30 pm in Taunton.

The win was especially sweet for Martha’s Vineyard. In the 2013 Division 3 South semifinal, Medway edged out the Vineyarders by the same score. Medway was a tough team, with an iron curtain defense that held the Vineyard’s star forward Jason Lages scoreless, and allowed him only two shots on goal.

Medway was 19-1 going into the Veterans Day semifinal.

Aksel Cooperrider and a Medway Mustang race for a ball in the right corner. —Photo by Randi Baird
Aksel Cooperrider and a Medway Mustang race for a ball in the right corner. —Photo by Randi Baird

“There are seven seniors who have been on varsity since their freshman year,” Medway Athletic Director Rob Pearl told The Times after the quarterfinals, “so it’s a good core group of kids that have come through our program. The past two years Medway made it to the State Final and lost by one goal in each of those games. It’s been a frustrating two years. They are playing strong this year and looking good.”

There was no shortage of Mohawk hairstyles on both teams. Weather conditions were perfect for a November afternoon, cloudy and 63 degrees.

In  a pregame conversation, Vineyard star defenseman Alex GordonBeck told assistant coach Ryan White, “I am going to leave this game a champion, I am not losing.”

After the game, Mr. White hugged Alex and told him, “I’m glad you’re true to your word.”

The Vineyarders had tremendous support from fans in the stands, thanks to the generosity of Our Market in Oak Bluffs, which paid for four chartered busses that transported supporters from Woods Hole to Taunton. Our Market manager Jamie McNeely told The Times that the business wanted to make it possible for kids to go to the game without any expense.

The Vineyard fans were loud and enthusiastic, chanting “I-believe-that-we-will-win” over and over again.

The first half saw intense action from both sides. Matt Stone earned his Varsity letter in the goal with a strong performance and nine saves overall.

Elie Jordi boots the ball away from an onrushing Medway midfielder. —Photo by Randi Baird
Elie Jordi boots the ball away from an onrushing Medway midfielder. —Photo by Randi Baird

Alex GordonBeck’s defense was magical. He constantly appeared out of nowhere to turn Medway drives in the opposite direction. There was artful footwork by Yannick Gonsalves, and Gordon Moore had a strong day as well.

“Gordon, today is the day!” coach Estaban Aranzabe shouted after a masterful defensive play.

The last 15 minutes of the first half was all Vineyard. Brandon Dwane scored the Vineyard’s first goal with 9:28 left in the half to thunderous applause, assisted by Ben Poole.

“I was holding my breath the rest of the game after that,” Brandon told The Times.

The game was played with three referees instead of the usual complement of two, which helped keep emotions in check.

Tensions ran high on both sides in the second half. Jason Lages received a yellow card following an altercation with an opposing player, but a couple of minutes later he was back in the game.

“We have a clean team and we came here to win,” Mr. Aranzabe told his team at the time out. “You know that, right? Now pressure, pressure, pressure!”

Shortly after, Jason was knocked down by a Medway player and the Vineyarders got the ball. A fired-up Lages addressed the crowd, “Let’s goooo!” after he stood up and sprinted back to his position. The crowd loved it and resumed its supportive chanting. Jason tried desperately to score, but the defense was all over him.

“Guys, they’re gonna come hard now,” Mr. Aranzabe told the boys with 14:35 left in the second half. Following that premonition, Medway’s Adam Karacaoglu scored the tying goal with 5:15 left in regulation time. “Can’t-be-beat, Can’t-be-beat,” shouted the Vineyard crowd.

Despite a massive effort from both teams, the tie propelled the game into a 10-minute overtime, which went scoreless.

“Keep your seatbelts fastened fans: we are going on,” said the P-A announcer at the close of the game’s regulation time.

The victorious Vineyarders celebrate after the big double overtime win. —Photo by Robin Davies
The victorious Vineyarders celebrate after the big double overtime win. —Photo by Robin Davies

In the second and final 10-minute overtime period, both teams gave it their all. Medway missed twice back-to-back with 2:34 left in the period, followed by one shot that landed on top of the net and yet another that shot over the net.

The Vineyarders pushed on. With barely two minutes left in the second overtime period Alex GordonBeck scored the game-winner assisted by Jason Lages, and brought the house down.

“I was so pumped for this year after what they did to us last year in overtime,” Brandon told The Times after the victory.

“We worked really hard for this game,” Coach Aranzabe said postgame. “We played against an amazing team. We did the work for our families and for our Island. Everyone should be proud of this group of men. Now it’s time to keep working and win the State (Championship). That’s our mission.”

The Vineyarders face number seven seed Norwell High School (15-3-5) in the Division 3 South championship Saturday at Taunton High School at 2:30 pm.

Our Market will once again arrange for buses to transport fans to the game. Buses will be waiting in Woods Hole for the noon boat from Vineyard Haven. To reserve space email Peggy Stone at stone5341@comcast.net.

 

Plans to build a garage near a 177-year-old Pagoda Tree at 29 South Water Street have been put on hold due to public outcry. Photo by Michael Cummo.

Updated 3 pm, Wednesday, November 12

Bowing to public outcry, the Edgartown conservation commission, meeting jointly with selectmen, voted unanimously Monday to reconsider its earlier approval for a private homeowner to build a garage near an iconic pagoda tree, one of the largest and oldest specimens of that variety of tree in America.

When Thomas Milton of Edgartown took time on one of his worldly voyages to preserve a cutting from a pagoda tree, and carried it back from China across the globe in a flower pot to the parcel on South Water Street where he was building a stately home befitting his status as a successful sea captain, it’s a fair bet he never imagined how much Edgartown would come to love his tree or the stir it would cause.

Captain Milton planted the tree, known then as a Chinese Huai tree (sophora japonica to tree scientists) in 1837, according to a bronze plaque near the base of the tree. According to various scientific studies, the lifespan of a typical urban tree, besieged by sidewalks, pavement, compacted soil and limited sunlight is about a tenth the lifespan of the same species in a rural setting. Yet the pagoda tree stands tall and relatively healthy at the ripe old age of 177.

Over the years, the tree has been walked by, climbed on, gazed at, and admired by generations of Edgartown residents and visitors. Its root system has been paved over, bricked over, driven over, and sealed under cement sidewalks. Though it sits on private land, it has become such a storied part of the town’s history that many people have come to think of it as if they owned it, in a collective sense.

When CarMax, Inc. CEO Thomas Folliard, the new owner of the house Captain Milton built, unveiled plans to build a new two-story, two-car carriage house style garage to go along with a large home restoration project and a new pool on the quarter-acre lot currently assessed at $7.7 million, the conservation commission questioned plans that called for the garage to be situated less than 25 feet from the beloved tree and heard not a peep.

 

Silent majority

A plaque at the base of the pagoda tree tells some of its history. —Photo by Michael Cummo
A plaque at the base of the pagoda tree tells some of its history. —Photo by Michael Cummo

Through four separate public meetings of the Edgartown conservation commission, no one came to speak in opposition, according to conservation commission members Christina Brown and Jeff Carlson. Commission members say they carefully considered the plans. Patrick Ahearn, the architect hired by contractor Norman Rankow, devised a cantilevered garage structure entirely above the existing ground surface, using support beams anchored in the existing foundation, and two new helical piles to support the corner of the garage nearest the Pagoda Tree. The design left the root system open to the air. Mark DiBiase, an arborist representative for Bartlett Tree Service hired by Mr. Rankow, devised a plan to water the tree, provide nutrients, and aerate the compacted soil.

In what he called a “tree preservation and remediation” plan, Mr. DiBiase recommended a series of precautions to protect the tree during construction, after reviewing plans with Mr. Rankow during a visit to the site.

“I am glad to see that it has been revised to include only two helical piles to help minimize the impact on the existing root system of the subject tree,” Mr. Dibiase wrote in a letter to Mr. Rankow. “In order to also help minimize root damage from the proposed footings, the pile locations should be hand dug or excavated with the use of an air spade. This will help preserve any larger roots that may be encountered and allow for some shifting of the final locations. Any roots that need to be cut shall be hand pruned with the use of sharp hand pruners and a hand saw.”

David Hawkins, a consulting arborist hired to advise town tree warden Stuart Fuller, reviewed the plan, and determined that it would adequately protect the tree.

“Both the cultivation/aeration process and the fertilizer application will help improve the soil and the tree’s ability to counteract any negative effects of the construction and encourage root growth in the area,” Mr. Hawkins wrote in his review for the town.

“We didn’t get any feedback from the public, throughout all those public sessions, which we were kind of surprised about,” Mr. Carlson said at Monday’s meeting. “You’re trying to make things work within the parameters of the bylaw. All the arborists seem to concur that it was going to be okay, and since none of us are arborists, we kind of have to go with their recommendation.”

Based on the opinions of the two tree experts, the conservation commission unanimously approved the plan on October 29.

As word began to filter around town people began to talk. A story published online in the Vineyard Gazette Thursday ignited a small brushfire among online commenters.

 

Tree bark

This architectural drawing shows the garage planned for 29 South Water Street. —Drawing by Patrick Ahearn, architect
This architectural drawing shows the garage planned for 29 South Water Street. —Drawing by Patrick Ahearn, architect

Edgartown selectmen invited the conservation commission members to join them at their regular Monday meeting, and asked them to rescind their vote.

“In going through the material,” said chairman Art Smadbeck, “I kept seeing words like ‘minimize root damage, the impact would be minimal.’ Basically, what it was speaking to me about was that something could happen to this tree. I know you can come up with all kinds of reasons how you can mitigate it, but when you start using words like mitigation, lessening the impact, that’s really the issue.”

Mr. Smadbeck said instead of mitigation, the debate should be framed by the effect of the construction near the tree, and the effect of not allowing the construction.

“If you do nothing there, that’s better than doing something there, no matter how good the plans,” Mr. Smadbeck said. “If there was a 1 in 100 chance that doing this could harm that tree, would it be worth it?”

Selectman Margaret Serpa, long a champion of the town’s shade trees, said she doesn’t want anything to happen to the pagoda tree on her watch.  “I don’t want to be associated with something happening to that tree,” she said. “This tree is irreplaceable, and I think we need to keep that in our minds. I didn’t see anything that was reassuring to me that the health of that tree was going to be protected. I didn’t feel comfortable.”

Selectman Michael Donaroma was out of town and did not attend Monday’s meeting, but he told the board he would have had to recuse himself, because his landscaping company might be contracted to work at the site.

 

For the defense

At Monday’s meeting, Mr. Rankow, owner of Colonial Reproductions, Inc. offered a vigorous defense of the plan to protect the tree. He read a statement in which he said the new owners have fashioned a unique public/private stewardship program.

“Up until now, the pagoda tree has not had any meaningful, monitored maintenance and has been surrounded by asphalt or concrete and has been subject to heavy vehicular traffic, underground oil contamination and benign neglect,” Mr. Rankow said. “For the first time in the tree’s life, we now have an opportunity on privately owned land and at no expense to the town, to provide nourishment, maintenance and a monitoring program to maintain the health of the tree.”

Later, Mr. Rankow said that commenters responding to an article posted online in the Gazette were uninformed.

“I don’t think the people making the comments have bothered to look at the process,” Mr. Rankow told selectmen. “We have vetted this very well with experts, and used their criteria. The people making the comments, and some of them are very rude, don’t know and understand the construction process that we’re proposing there.”

That didn’t sit well with selectmen.

“That’s your opinion,” Ms. Serpa said.

“I think the townspeople of Edgartown are pretty well informed,” Mr. Smadbeck said.

 

Plan uprooted

Bowing to the public outcry, the conservation commission, meeting formally in joint session with the selectmen on Monday, voted unanimously to reconsider its vote.

Conservation commission member Christina Brown said that, although the commission had approved the plans, the order has not yet been signed and registered with the town clerk.

“It’s not done,” Ms. Brown said. “I’m sorry people didn’t come to the public hearings. I would welcome, I think the conservation commission would welcome, another round of much more detailed discussion.”

The conservation commission plans to discuss the issues at its next regularly scheduled meeting on December 3.

Tim Boland, executive director of the Polly Hill Arboretum in West Tisbury, is one of those who weighed in against the plan online and in a telephone interview. Mr. Boland said disturbing the tree’s root system, which likely extends outward about as far as the tree’s leafy canopy, would be risky.

“The problem with any type of construction in and around the roots of a tree, particularly a tree of that age which has probably lived 85 to 90 percent of its lifespan, any type of work is going to cause the tree to decline,” Mr. Boland said in a phone interview with The Times prior to Monday’s meeting. “Typically, a tree of that size is not going to be very responsive to efforts to revitalize it, or make it flourish, like have a second wind.”

Mr. Folliard could not be reached for comment on the uproar.

 

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Judge Chin said the Martha's Vineyard Airport Commission is responsible for the care and custody of the airport.

Updated 3:15 pm Wednesday, November 12

A Dukes County Superior Court Judge  issued a temporary restraining order last Wednesday that prevents the Dukes County Commission from expanding the Martha’s Vineyard Airport Commission (MVAC) by appointing two new members to increase its size from seven to nine members.

As he did in an earlier ruling on August 7 on four other points in the long-running and costly legal dispute, Associate Justice Richard J. Chin sided with the airport commission, which argued that the county vote to expand the airport commission was a violation of the grant assurances agreed to by the county, and which provided millions of dollars in state and federal grants to the airport under the condition the county “agree not to reorganize the MVAC or in any way interfere with the autonomy and authority of the MVAC.”

“The court concludes that it will not harm the public interest to continue operating the airport with only seven members on the MVAC, as it has been operated for some time,” Judge Chin wrote in his November 5 decision. “Further, the county’s alleged violation of the grant assurances could put the MVAC’s funding at risk and interfere with its ability to operate the airport safely and efficiently to the detriment of the public. The county is enjoined from expanding the size of the MVAC and appointing new commissioners to the MVAC or from otherwise interfering with the autonomy and authority of the MVAC without the express written approval of the Aeronautics Division.”

In an October 7 hearing before Judge Chin, MVAC attorney David Mackey, of the Cambridge law firm Anderson and Kreiger, argued that the county commission’s September 24 vote to expand the airport commission violated state law, and violated the grant assurances, in which the county commission acknowledged the airport commission’s sole authority for “custody, care, and management” of the airport. He also argued that any attempt to reorganize the airport commission without permission from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division, violated the grant assurances.

Judge Chin said state law grants the county commission the authority to establish an airport commission, but does not give it authority to change the makeup of the commission once it is established.

“Particularly considering the history between the parties,” Judge Chin wrote, “the court concludes that the MVAC had shown a likelihood of success on the merits of its contention that by adding two additional seats to the MVAC, the county is trying to reorganize the MVAC and/or interfere with the autonomy and authority of the MVAC.”

The county had argued that any grant assurances must respect the authority of the county commission to appoint the airport commission. In a footnote, Judge Chin wrote that the county “makes a convoluted argument.”

 

Reaction

In a phone interview with The Times on November 7, Mr. Mackey said he was pleased with the decision. “We’re pleased that the court once again has clearly affirmed that the airport commission, not the county, has authority over the airport,” he said. “We’re also pleased that the court once again has blocked the county’s attempt to take control of the airport commission by changing its membership. We look forward to bringing this case, and the issue of the airport commission’s autonomy and authority, to a prompt and final resolution. The airport commission intends to pursue its claims as speedily and aggressively as possible.”

Airport manager Sean Flynn said the airport commission has not met since September 26, as it waited for the court to rule.

“From my perspective as the executive officer, now that we’ve received clarification of what the makeup of the airport commission is, we can move forward again with the current membership,” Mr. Flynn said. He said the airport commission is tentatively scheduled to meet next on November 21.

County commission chairman Leonard Jason Jr. said the decision was confusing, especially on Judge Chin’s ruling that the county commission cannot expand the airport commission without permission from the Aeronautics Division.

“I really don’t understand how he can say that,” Mr. Jason said. “We asked Mass. Aeronautics, they said we could. It’s very confusing.”

Mr. Jason was asked if the county commissioners intend to continue defending the lawsuit. “Obviously we haven’t met, so I can’t answer that,” he said.

 

Explanation demanded

On September 24, the county commissioners voted 6 to 0, with one abstention, to increase the size of the airport commission to nine members. The commissioners immediately appointed pilot and businessman Myron Garfinkle of West Tisbury and Robert Rosenbaum, a seasonal resident of Chilmark, former businessman, and pilot.

The county commissioners said the move was warranted because a large number of qualified candidates had expressed interest in filling the seat left vacant by the recent departure of Peter Bettencourt.

Former airport commissioner and current county commissioner John Alley of West Tisbury was the only dissenting vote. Mr. Alley questioned whether the expansion would violate the grant assurances.

County manager Martina Thornton told commissioners that she had researched the issue of expanding the size of the airport commission. She assured the commissioners she did not foresee any problems and cited a phone conversation with the counsel from MassDOT.

One day after the county commission vote, in a letter dated September 25,

Christopher Willenborg, MassDOT Aeronautics Division administrator, asked the county for an explanation of the vote and said that any such reorganization or interference would require the express written approval of the Aeronautics Division.

 

Previous injunctions

In an August 7 ruling, Judge Chin sided with the airport commission on four other issues in the latest lawsuit, which was filed in response to actions of the county commission this year.

In that ruling, Judge Chin said the county commission is enjoined from appointing the county manager to the airport commission as an ex-officio, nonvoting member; the county manager is enjoined from serving in such a capacity; and the county treasurer is enjoined from refusing to pay invoices duly approved for payment by the airport commission, from obtaining privileged or confidential communications between the airport commission and its attorneys without notice to, or the consent of, the airport commission, and from releasing those communications between the airport commission and its attorneys to the public.

At issue in the legal dispute are two conflicting state laws, Chapter 34, which governs how the county operates, and Chapter 90, which establishes airport commissions as the sole authority to operate airports. In every instance throughout the 14-year legal dispute, courts have ruled that Chapter 90 prevails in any conflict between the two laws, and that the county agreed to abide by Chapter 90 as a condition of receiving state and federal funding.

At its October 8 meeting, the county commission unanimously approved a motion made by county commissioner Christine Todd of Oak Bluffs to request a meeting with airport commissioners to mediate differences between the two boards. Ms. Todd also sits on the airport commission, having been appointed by her fellow county commissioners in an earlier dustup that saw the county use its appointing authority muscle to remove Mr. Alley, a longtime airport commissioner, and Ben Hall Jr. of Edgartown.

County manager Martina Thornton drafted and sent a letter to the airport commissioners. Ms. Todd said she is not aware that any airport commissioners have agreed to meet.

“I don’t really understand why anyone would go to litigation without at least attempting to talk about the problem,” Ms. Todd said in a phone interview Wednesday. “There is absolutely no effort being made by anyone at the airport to have an open and respectful dialogue with anyone at the county. At this point, there’s probably not much at all to mediate.”

 

Legal costs

The legal squabbling has been costly. According to figures compiled by county treasurer Noreen Mavro Flanders, the airport commission has spent $33,463 in the current fiscal year on legal costs associated with its lawsuit against the county. According to county manager Martina Thornton, the county has spent $11,453 to defend itself, which leaves only about $1,007 in the amount allotted for the lawsuit in the county budget. Ms. Thornton said the county has yet to be billed for attorney Robert Troy’s preparation and appearance at the October 7 hearing, and expects that bill to exceed the amount budgeted.

The County Advisory Board (CAB), made up of one selectman from each Island town, which is responsible for oversight of the county budget, must approve any additional expenditures for legal costs. At a joint meeting of the county commission and the CAB on October 29, the two boards clashed over legal costs.

“I don’t think the county should be spending any more money on this issue,” said Jeffrey “Skipper” Manter, the West Tisbury representative to the CAB.

“So you think the county should just walk away from the lawsuit,” Mr. Jason asked.

“I don’t believe it’s valuable to spend taxpayer dollars, because I don’t think it makes any difference to the people which side wins or loses,” said Mr. Manter.

Acting CAB chairman Art Smadbeck of Edgartown declined to comment on the latest ruling.

Firefighters hose down a smokey brush fire at the Keene pit in West Tisbury Tuesday night.

Firefighters from four towns were called to a roaring brush fire at the Keene Excavation brush pit off Old Stage Rd. at approximately 8 pm on Tuesday night.

West Tisbury fire chief Manny Estrella said extinguishing the blaze required mutual aid from Tisbury, Aquinnah, and Chilmark. It took 30 firefighters approximately five hours to put out the fire.

“We flowed from 250,000 to 300,000 gallons of water,” Chief Estrella told The Times. “It was a pretty big fire.”  One firefighter was treated for dehydration at Martha’s Vineyard Hospital and released Wednesday morning. Since there was no property damage, Chief Estrella said there will be no further investigation into the cause, which he thinks started in a wood chip pile, most likely from a discarded cigarette.

The Oak Bluffs wastewater treatment plant processed 30.3 million gallons of sewage in 2013. —Photo by Michael Cummo

Updated 6:20 pm, Friday

At a recent meeting of the Oak Bluffs Wastewater Commission on October 15, members of the Oak Bluffs Association (OBA), several of them among the town’s largest users, expressed their unhappiness with the current rate structure. They also charged that the town had, over a six-year period, mistakenly drawn over $650,000 from the wastewater enterprise fund, money that should have been used to defray system costs, and as a result the largest users paid more than their fair share.

A closer examination of their complaints revealed that several years ago the confluence of dire financial times and the untimely death of town treasurer Paul Manzi contributed to an accounting oversight, in which a one time emergency transfer from the wastewater enterprise fund repeated for an additional four years.

A look across the state reveals that Oak Bluffs has one  of the highest sewage rates in Massachusetts. As the town considers additional sewering to address the rapidly declining health of water bodies, business owners who contend they’ve already shouldered an inordinate amount of the town sewering costs want to see changes in the department’s operation and rate structure.

Punitive rates
Oak Bluffs wastewater customers are billed on an ascending scale, meaning the price per gallon goes up as usage increases. OBA board director Terry McCarthy said the ascending scale places an undue burden on the larger businesses, especially restaurants and hotels, that already contribute considerable excise tax revenue to town coffers. “From a big user’s point of view, the ascending scale is punitive,” Mr. McCarthy, a former state representative who has harborside commercial interests, told The Times. “They say it’s to make people conserve, but I think that argument is a little specious. With a flat rate, you pay more if you use more, so that incentive is still there. This is particularly hard on restaurants and hotels. If you run a large hotel, what do you do? Make people take shorter showers?”

“The ascending rate structure is endorsed by Department of Environmental Protection because it encourages people to save water,” wastewater commissioner and selectman Gail Barmakian told The Times.  “Some very big users have saved considerable amounts of water, and saved themselves a lot of money, so it does work. Also, you have to consider that being hooked up to wastewater has allowed some businesses to expand and become more profitable. That’s a service to the town as well, but it gives them an advantage.”
About one third of Massachusetts communities bill on an ascending scale, according to the 2012 Tighe and Bond Massachusetts sewer rate survey.

Oak Bluffs property owners are charged a penny a gallon for the first 40,000 gallons used per annum and the rate goes up in 40,000 gallon increments until it tops out at 2.8 cents a gallon for 360,001 gallons and above. There is no difference between commercial and residential rates. Usage rates have not increased since the system went into operation on April 1, 2002.

According to the Tighe and Bond survey, the average yearly charge for sewage in Oak Bluffs was $1,020. The state average was $646. Only 12 percent of communities in the survey averaged $1,000 or more per year. Comparatively, the Edgartown annual average was $520, according to the survey. Tisbury, was not listed in the survey, but according to the town website, the department of public works charges a flat fee of 3.1 cents per gallon.

Sludge is costly
Lisa Merritt, an Oak Bluffs wastewater department administrator and lab technician who’s been with the department since its inception, told The Times there are many reasons why Oak Bluffs sewage rates rank among the highest in the state. “We have to ship our sludge off Island, which costs over $80,000 a year,” she said. “We run a sequencing batch reactor plant (SBR), which is expensive because it requires over 300 grinder pumps, working 24/7, and they need maintenance 24/7. An SBR plant has the smallest footprint and it’s the cheapest to build, but it’s also the least cost-effective in the long run.  Another reason is our effluent — the treated water — is pumped under Ocean Park, which is extremely expensive. Edgartown uses open pits.”

Burdensome betterments
In addition to usage fees, Oak Bluffs wastewater customers pay betterment fees, which cover the actual cost of installing the sewering and thereby “bettering” their property. Betterment fees were initially $10,000 for residences and $20,000 for businesses. In 2007, betterment fees were recalculated based on usage, again hitting the biggest users the hardest.

According to Peter Martell, owner of the 95-room Wesley Hotel, the largest hotel in Oak Bluffs, his betterment fee increased 1000 percent. “The original price for betterments was $10,000 for a residence and $20,000 for a business,” Mr. Martell told The Times. “The state didn’t like that formula for some reason. So my betterment bill went from $20,000 to $200,000 in one year.”

Ms. Merritt said the initial betterment fees were always noted as temporary. “You cannot give a final betterment figure until all of the final bills are tallied when a new wastewater system or any large project is complete,” she wrote in an email to The Times. “It was explained to everyone that the [initial] estimates had been recalculated using water usage and included the final numbers for the completion of building the new wastewater treatment plant. In the case of the Wesley Hotel, the betterment was $168,675.69,” Ms. Merritt wrote. “The new betterment figure started the 20-year repayment period over again in 2007, subtracting what was paid between 2002 and 2007 with a repayment interest rate of 2 percent.”

Room to flow
According to Mr. McCarthy, who was a member of the first Oak Bluffs wastewater committee, it was assumed the treatment plant would need to expand its footprint for additional sewering around the ponds, the harbor, and other critical areas. As a result, they purchased a five-acre lot directly across Pennsylvania Ave., known as the Leonardo property. But when it came time to make the payment in FY 2009, the town was broke.

“When the first year principal was due, [town administrator] Michael Dutton and [town treasurer] Paul Manzi went to wastewater begging us to help pay just this one time,” Mr. McCarthy said.

According to the minutes from the March 12, 2008 water commissioners meeting, “Paul Manzi also requested that the Wastewater Department pay the Leonardo property loan payment this year and for one year only because the Town is in a budget shortfall. The loan payment is approximately $136,000.”

At town meeting in April 2008 (FY 2009), the town approved an article to pay for the Leonardo property. “This year only, the wastewater department will be paying for the principal and interest for the purchase of the Leonardo property,” voters were told in the executive summary.

“We were told this was a one time deal to get the town out of a tight spot,” Mr. McCarthy said. “But subsequent to that in [FY] 2010, 2011, 2013 and 2014, the payments continued and nobody was ever told. Never once did anybody, from the finance committee or the selectmen go to the wastewater commission and say, ‘By the way, we’re going to just tap these payments out of your account.’

“Since the money is controlled by the town, even though it’s our fund, it’s very frustrating. There was a total of $794,871 taken out of our account, of which only $136,500 was actually authorized by wastewater commissioners. Somebody made the decision to quietly and covertly make these payments in subsequent years, but no one was told these amounts were being appropriated from the Wastewater Retained Earnings Fund.”

After investigating Mr. McCarthy’s claims, town accountant Arthur Gallagher told The Times that Mr. McCarthy was essentially correct, except that the town, not the wastewater commission, covered the $117,125 mortgage payment in FY 2014.

Mr. Gallagher, who became town accountant in March 2012, said he could only speculate on why the wastewater enterprise fund was repeatedly tapped for the Leonardo property purchase. “What I think occurred is with the death of Mr. Manzi, no one in the Town’s administration knew the terms of the agreement and therefore continued to charge wastewater 100 percent of the pay down,” he wrote to The Times. “Additionally, the consultants hired to fill this void would not be charged with changing and or setting new policies. Not being present during [that] period, this is all supposition on my part.”

Mr. Gallagher said the town will pay off the rest of the loan. “Typically these payments would be split 50-50 with the town,” he said. “Wastewater made the paid first five payments and we’re paying the last five that will be reduced in budget moving forward.”

Water under the bridge
“We’re not pointing a finger at anyone,” OBA vice president Renee Balter said. “We discovered this problem and think it should be given some thought.” Ms. Balter also said that future town meeting appropriation articles should close the loophole that says, “or to take from any other source.”

Some business owners would like to see reduced rates to make up for the yeoman’s share they’ve paid over the years. “If they’ve been taking $100,000 plus every year it stands to reason they could give a reduced rate, or increased flow, to the high gallonage people,” Mr. McCarthy said.

Mr. Martell concurred. “The bottom line is our fees should be dropped,” he said. “I give them the benefit of the doubt, they can’t drop it much. The only way to do that is to expand the system, and the town needs to do that to save the ponds. Hopefully it’s not too late.”

Mr. McCarthy said that the current town sewering and treatment plant are greatly diminished versions of what he and some of the original wastewater commission advocated. “There was a contingent, which I was a part of, that wanted to sewer most of the town, and there was a strong contingent that wanted to kill the whole thing, because they thought sewering would encourage development and ruin the environment,” he said. “Now we’re trying to figure out ways to sewer areas near the Lagoon, Sunset Lake, Crystal Lake, and Sengekontacket, and we’re going to pay a helluva lot more for it than we would have back then. That’s water under the bridge. Moving forward we have to work with commissioners and selectmen to develop a long-range plan to increase treatment capacity, and we have to act quickly.”

Correction: A reference to the Edgartown wastewater plant in an earlier version of this story mischaracterized some of that plant’s operations and accounting systems. There is no additional drain charge. Bills are calculated by the current charge of $68 per drain. The Edgartown system is not almost entirely a gravity collection system. In fact, of the 1,100 accounts there are more than 400 grinder pumps. Edgartown did not avoid sludge shipping costs and spent $110,000 to ship and dispose of 675 tons of sludge off-Island in FY14. Lastly, while a filter press reduces transport costs, the processing and disposal of septic tank waste and the sludge generated from it are operating costs for the facility ($65,000 in FY14). Revenue from septic haulers does not go into the facility’s operating budget, but is returned to the town’s general fund.

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Island voters went to the polls yesterday and mostly followed statewide trends.

Martha’s Vineyard voters overwhelmingly chose Martha Coakley (D) over Charlie Baker (R) in the governor’s race, 4,457 to 2,469, while the rest of the state propelled Mr. Baker to victory. Ms. Coakley conceded to Mr. Baker Wednesday morning in a race decided by less than 2 percent, or 40,000 votes, statewide.

The local tally represented a slide in popularity for Mr. Baker. Four years ago, when he challenged incumbent governor Deval Patrick, he captured 2,757 Island votes.

In the only contested Island races, voters in Aquinnah, Chilmark, and West Tisbury were asked to elect five people to four-year terms on the Up-Island Regional School Committee. There are two names on the official ballot and four declared write-in candidates.

Jeffrey “Skipper” Manter of West Tisbury (1,364) and Michael Marcus of West Tisbury (1,158), the only candidates whose names appeared on the ballot, won by wide margins.

Write-in candidates Kate DeVane of West Tisbury (409), Robert Lionette of Chilmark (183), and Theresa Manning of Aquinnah (374) received enough write-in votes to be elected. Incumbent Roxanne Ackerman of Aquinnah (90) was last in the vote count.

All seven seats were up for grabs on the Dukes County Commission.

The election ballot listed the names of four candidates, all incumbents, leaving three slots open to write-in candidates. Christine Todd of Oak Bluffs, an incumbent who failed to get on the ballot, and Gretchen Tucker Underwood of Oak Bluffs, a newcomer to Island politics, had announced write-in campaigns. Veteran county commissioner Lenny Jason of Chilmark had not.

In the race for Dukes County Commission, unofficial results show John Alley of West Tisbury (the top vote getter with 4,388 votes), Leon Brathwaite of West Tisbury, Tristan Israel of Tisbury, and David Holway of Edgartown, all on the ballot, won reelection. The two declared write-in candidates, Ms. Todd (290) and Ms. Underwood (138), won enough votes to be seated on the county commission, as did Mr. Jason (252). Ms. Underwood is the only newcomer to the commission.

On Tuesday, voters also made the biennial selection of the nine elected members of the Martha’s Vineyard Commission (MVC). Nine candidates appeared on the official ballot.

Clarence “Trip” Barnes of Tisbury, Christina Brown of Edgartown, Joshua Goldstein of Tisbury, Douglas Sederholm of West Tisbury, and Linda Sibley of West Tisbury were reelected to the MVC. Fred Hancock of Oak Bluffs and James Vercruysse of Aquinnah, MVC appointees seeking to become elected members of the commission, will also now serve in their own right. Abraham Seiman of Oak Bluffs, a retired health care administrator who serves on numerous town boards, and Robert Doyle of Chilmark, a retired substance abuse counselor involved in public health advocacy and addiction counseling, are the only new members.

In a special West Tisbury election tinged with sadness, West Tisbury voters elected a new town moderator to fill the position held for 23 years by Pat Gregory, who was murdered while vacationing in California last May. Dan Waters, development director of the Martha’s Vineyard Museum and a longtime resident of West Tisbury, was the only candidate on the ballot.

In statewide races, Vineyarders generally followed statewide trends. Island voters chose Maura Healey (D) for attorney general over John Miller (R) 5,046 to 2,000.

Deborah Goldberg (D) was the choice of local voters over Michael Heffernan in the race for treasurer, 4,418 to 2,076.

William Keating (D) easily won reelection to Congress, while state senator Dan Wolf (D), and state representative Tim Madden (D), who ran unopposed, will return to the statehouse.

Edward Markey (D) trounced his opponent Brian J. Herr (R) for a U.S. Senate seat by a vote of 5,134 to 1,991.

Michael O’Keefe (R) won reelection as the Cape and Islands district attorney, but Island voters opted for his opponent Richard Barry (D) by a vote of 3,753 to 3,068.

Ballot Questions

Vineyard voters also showed a contrary streak on several referendum questions on the ballot.

On Question 1, statewide, voters decided to eliminate the provision of state law that adjusts the gas tax annually to account for inflation. Vineyarders opted to make no change in the law, by a vote of 3,587 to 3,278.

By a wide margin, voters both statewide and locally defeated Question 2, choosing not to expand the bottle deposits to most bottled water and juice containers. On Martha’s Vineyard the measure was defeated 4,304 to 2,826.

Question 3, a measure to repeal the recently enacted gaming laws that allow casinos in Massachusetts, was rejected statewide. Island voters voted to repeal the casino law, 4,034 to 3,026.

Question 4, a measure that would allow employees to earn paid or unpaid sick time, easily won approval from Massachusetts voters. Locally, voters approved the measure 4,099 to 2,806.

In a non-binding referendum to expand the emergency planning zone around the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant to include all of Barnstable County, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket, Island voters overwhelmingly approved the measure, 4,693 to 1,510.

Preliminary vote totals show 7,340, or about 53 percent, of the Island’s 13,719 registered voters cast ballots in the 2014 elections.

By contrast, in the 2010 election a total of 8,523 of the Island’s 13,314 registered voters, or 64 percent, went to the polls.

2014 Election Results (Updated November 7 at 10am)

Aquinnah

Chilmark

Edgartown

Oak Bluffs

Tisbury

West Tisbury

Gosnold

Island Totals

U.S. Senate

x

Edward J. Markey (D)

171

403

1063

1205

1180

1112

27

5134

Brian J. Herr (R)

22

98

607

556

422

286

19

1991

Governor

x

Baker and Polito (R)

40

136

731

677

516

369

24

2469

Coakley and Kerrigan (D)

147

344

894

1037

1051

984

20

4457

Falchuk and Jennings (United Independent)

6

16

41

57

34

35

1

189

Lively and Saunders (I)

3

2

14

10

8

7

44

McCormick and Post (I)

3

5

16

17

19

16

76

Attorney General

x

Maura Healey (D)

166

402

1031

1188

1163

1096

24

5046

John B. Miller (R)

25

96

618

557

420

284

20

2000

Secretary of State

x

William Francis Galvin (D)

160

386

1153

1258

1182

1090

25

5229

David D’ArCangelo (R)

15

77

441

430

314

223

17

1500

Daniel L. Factor (Green-Rainbow)

16

27

54

56

89

66

2

308

Treasurer

x

Deborah B. Goldberg (D)

143

336

920

1025

1025

969

17

4418

Michael James Heffernan (R)

25

105

628

581

436

301

24

2076

Ian T. Jackson (Green-Rainbow)

18

40

55

75

100

76

1

364

Auditor

x

Suzanne M. Bump (D)

144

339

934

1060

1016

967

21

4460

Patricia S. Saint Aubin (R)

20

101

571

531

406

276

20

1905

MK Merelice (Green-Rainbow)

14

36

69

76

105

71

1

371

Representative in Congress

x

William Richard Keating (D)

163

405

1064

1201

1168

1108

22

5109

John C. Chapman (R)

26

93

592

552

423

289

22

1975

Governor’s Council, First District

x

Joseph C. Ferreira (D)

145

382

1126

1229

1193

1029

29

5104

Senator in General Court

x

Daniel A. Wolf (D)

164

399

1073

1196

1193

1128

23

5153

Ronald R. Beaty, Jr. (R)

20

90

544

513

376

234

20

1777

Representative in General Court

x

Timothy R. Madden (D)

166

425

1210

1333

1300

1151

32

5585

District Attorney

x

Michael D. O’Keefe (R)

53

176

869

814

669

487

24

3068

Richard G. Barry (D)

130

303

741

883

868

828

16

3753

Register of Probate

x

Elizabeth J. Herrmann (R)

101

295

1172

1142

1038

795

35

4543

County Treasurer

x

Noreen Mavro Flanders (unenrolled)

123

362

1121

1189

1170

951

32

4948

County Commissioner

x

John S. Alley (D)

132

329

940

1064

1037

886

26

4388

x

Leon Arthur Brathwaite (D)

115

281

785

870

881

774

26

3706

x

Tristan Israel (Unenrolled)

136

326

936

955

1051

871

26

4275

x

David Jeffrey Holway (D)

106

265

835

831

861

730

24

3628

x

Christine Todd (write-in)

12

23

71

86

98

290

x

Leonard Jason, Jr. (write in)

11

21

70

60

90

252

x

Gretchen Underwood

7

14

27

50

40

138

Martha’s Vineyard Commission

x

Clarence A. Barnes, III

134

358

1147

1149

1139

957

4884

x

Christina Brown

110

307

1045

959

938

837

4196

x

Joshua Seth Goldstein

104

286

825

863

885

768

3731

x

Ernest Douglas Sederholm

103

314

847

865

866

808

3803

x

Linda Bauer Sibley

115

305

838

877

922

805

3862

x

Robert McMillen Doyle

105

289

779

808

869

736

3586

x

Fred J. Hancock

93

244

815

950

824

678

3604

x

Abraham L. Seiman

91

232

759

868

778

652

3380

x

James Vercruysse

144

293

786

839

851

744

3657

Up-Island School Committee

x

Jeffrey “Skipper” Manter

116

309

939

1364

x

Michael Marcus

95

279

784

1158

Roxanne Ackerman (write-in)

35

26

29

90

x

Kate DeVane (write-in)

21

39

349

409

x

Robert Lionette (write-in)

24

66

93

183

x

Theresa Manning (write-in)

72

75

227

374

West Tisbury Town Moderator

x

Daniel Waters

1304

1304

Chilmark Proposition 2.5 exemption (Road Repairs)

x

Yes

308

308

No

110

110

Question 1 (Gasoline Tax)

x

Yes

90

211

844

827

748

558

17

3278

No

93

273

783

887

788

763

27

3587

Question 2 (Bottle Returns)

Yes

90

279

576

626

590

665

18

2826

x

No

106

222

1092

1136

1023

725

27

4304

Question 3 (Repeal Casinos)

Yes

127

379

904

839

928

857

30

4034

x

No

68

118

750

900

674

516

15

3026

Question 4 (Earned Sick Time)

x

Yes

120

288

866

969

1001

855

25

4099

No

52

159

762

749

583

501

12

2806

Question 5 (Pilgrim Nuclear Plant) (not binding)

x

Yes

135

344

1004

1097

1129

984

21

4693

No

28

72

414

430

327

239

11

1510

Voter turnout:

Total votes cast:

200

511

1716

1819

1657

1437

7340

Percentage of electorate that voted:

53.8

54.5

52.1

48.9

49.3

57.8

52.73