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The Island enjoys a storm for the record books.

Maybe eight inches, maybe 10. Maybe 12 to 18. Maybe some rain. Maybe not. Definitely some wind. By mid-day Monday, Jan. 26, forecasts for the winter’s first big storm on Martha’s Vineyard ranged from “serious” to “blizzard.” By the time the first flakes fell at mid-day,  forecasters had dialed up their snow predictions, wind gust speeds, and warnings for the Island went from winter storm to blizzard.

After lingering for close to 40 hours, Juno finally sailed off to Downeast Maine, having dumped over two feet of snow on the Vineyard; the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) posted estimates of 27 inches in Oak Bluffs as of 3 am on Wednesday.

 

 

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Lucy Hackney shares memories of her family’s friendship with Rosa Parks.

Lucy Hackney, at home in Vineyard Haven. – Photo by Michael Cummo

For most of us, history is relegated to dusty books and museum walls, to school lessons and hazy tales retold by our grandparents; so when we find an Island neighbor who has woven a few threads in the collective reality we call our own, she must be counted as a true treasure, and as a reminder that individual lives can impact the world. This Sunday morning at the Unitarian Universalist Society in Vineyard Haven, Lucy Hackney will share her treasury of memories with the public, bringing to life the revolutionary legacy of the Montgomery bus boycott and her lifelong friendship with the heroic Rosa Parks.

Virginia Durr, left, with Rosa Parks at the fiftieth anniversary of the Highlander Fold School, Tennessee, October 1982. — Photo by Tom Gardner
Virginia Durr, left, with Rosa Parks at the fiftieth anniversary of the Highlander Fold School, Tennessee, October 1982. — Photo by Tom Gardner

Ms. Hackney has forged a life enveloped by momentous events –– one of four daughters of civil rights icons Cliff and Virginia Foster Durr, her own law career was groundbreaking in both children’s rights and mental-disabilities advocacy. Ms. Hackney’s story lassos history, breathing life into the myth. Growing up between Washington, D.C., where Lucy’s father served as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, appointed by President Roosevelt, and Jim Crow Alabama, where her parents’ involvement in desegregation led to death threats and harassment, Ms. Hackney’s social consciousness and idealism were bred from the cradle.

Family life for the Durr children was marked by the often difficult consequences of having activist parents. Ms. Hackney’s mother, Virginia Foster Durr, wrote in her autobiography, Outside the Magic Circle, that her children would run into the kitchen, unfazed at announcing, “Mama, the laundry man is here, Mama, the milkman is here, Mama, the FBI men are here … good God, what a family we were.” Ms. Hackney said she always knew they lived a unique life; threats came not only from authorities who were terrified of outspoken citizens bent on upsetting the rigid establishment of the ’50s and ’60s (the Durrs were among the innocent citizens strategically hunted by the House Committee on Un-American Activities), but from other white Southern families, afraid of losing their monopoly on civil rights and power.

Ms. Hackney shares photographs of her mother and Rosa Parks. — Michael Cummo
Ms. Hackney shares photographs of her mother and Rosa Parks. — Michael Cummo

Long before Rosa Parks earned her mythic place in American history, Virginia Foster Durr was friends with the talented, literary, soft-spoken seamstress from a Montgomery, Ala., department store. Ms. Hackney, always referring to the hero of the bus boycott as “Mrs. Parks,” said, “She was just a lovely, elegant woman. She was such a fine lady, so humble, but strong as well. Not many people know how educated she was; this was because as a child she had been tutored by white women bent on educating black girls in Alabama. Mother always told me how this underground tutoring of black girls by white women began because they were disgusted with the poor quality of education at that time. … I think this added to Mrs. Parks’s courage against segregation; she had been around white people since childhood.”

Ms. Hackney and the gallery of photos in her home.  – Michael Cummo
Ms. Hackney and the gallery of photos in her home. – Michael Cummo

Ms. Hackney’s family become intimately and legally entwined with Rosa Parks the fateful night of Dec. 1, 1955, when Ms. Hackney’s father, then practicing law in Montgomery, got a call from a colleague alerting him to an arrest involving a friend. The Montgomery municipality had charged Rosa Parks with violating an ordinance by refusing to give up her seat in a “whites only” section of a town bus. Ms. Hackney explained how Rosa Parks was on her way home after a long day and said, “You know, she was simply tired. Too tired to get up for that white man who wanted the seat. And she just decided, then and there, now was the time.” That beautiful and peaceful act of revolution started a firestorm, but before the sparks spread, it was Lucy’s father who went down to the jailhouse and posted bail for Mrs. Parks.

Rosa Parks altered Ms. Hackney's wedding gown, but could not attend the ceremony, unless she was seated in a special area reserved for servants. She opted not to go. — Michael Cummo
Rosa Parks altered Ms. Hackney’s wedding gown, but could not attend the ceremony, unless she was seated in a special area reserved for servants. She opted not to go. — Michael Cummo

“My father,” Ms. Hackney said, “quickly suggested that Mrs. Parks obtain African-American representation … he thought it would be better in the long run for the cause, but yes, he stayed involved in the case for the duration.” In an article published last summer in Alabama Heritage, biographer Thomas E. Reidy wrote, “The Durrs’ involvement with Rosa Parks, and efforts to integrate the buses, would have surprised no one in Montgomery. For most of their adult lives … they stood up to criticism and charges that their ideas were subversive. Over time those ‘subversive ideas’ –– like educational television, broader access to voting, and extended civil liberties –– have become the status quo.” Ms. Hackney was a teenager then, but already gathering the gravity of this bipolar world, and the valor of trying to change it. “It wasn’t always easy,” she said, “but it was an amazing life, and I was proud of my family … my parents doing what they did and my sisters answering the phone with death threats on the other end.”

Standing now, decades later, in her Vineyard Haven kitchen, aglow with winter’s white light, Lucy remarks that “the Island is my home, mainly because my family has made it their home. My husband and I followed our children here, first in the glorious summers, but immediately after Sheldon’s retirement from his presidency at the University of Pennsylvania, we came full-time. The thing that has always been the most value to us is having our family near, being near our roots.” Ms. Hackney fans out photos of herself, her mother, and Rosa Parks sitting together sharing tea, years after the tumultuous era of segregation. She holds her gaze on the photo, saying, “Mrs. Parks was an incredibly talented seamstress; in fact, she did the alterations on my wedding dress, would you like to see?”

Upstairs in the family photo gallery, a portrait of the young bride draped in satin hangs prominently. Ms. Hackney quietly says, “You know, she wasn’t even allowed to come to my wedding. Well, she was allowed, but according to the church in Montgomery, she could come only if she sat up near the organ, or wore a ridiculous nurse’s outfit, pretending to be my childhood nanny, you know, pretending to be my servant.” Ms. Hackney, like her mother before her, abhorred the segregated South, and still speaks with raw emotion of the injustice. “So I fully supported,” she continued, “Mrs. Parks’ decision not to come at all. She told me, ‘Lucy, you know I want nothing more than to be there for you and Sheldon, but I just can’t do it.’”

It takes great imagination for anyone under the age of 40 to grasp the reality of the ugliness of Jim Crow laws in America and the subsequent necessity of revolution for our nation’s soul and sanity. In Outside the Magic Circle, Virginia Durr unabashedly writes, “Actually the whole idea of segregation was based on the idea that blacks were diseased. … You couldn’t drink from the same water fountain or use the same bathroom because they were diseased. You couldn’t sit by them on the bus because they smelled bad. You couldn’t eat with them in the drugstore or restaurant because they were offensive, smelled bad, and were diseased. The Negroes had to suffer under the most painful thing in the world –– the feeling of being unattractive. … The white people were telling the black people in their own person they were ugly and black. … That’s a terrible burden for a people to bear.”

To usher in Black History Month, the Unitarian Universalist Church will host three readings from Outside the Magic Circle, anchored by Lucy’s own reflections on the era and her experiences as a white girl growing up with freedom-fighting parents. There will be music by Dan Waters, Peter McClain, and Monica Van Horn, and local guest readers who personally share in the legacy of civil rights and the fight for equality: Esther Hopkins, Nancy Cox, and Roger and Jane Thayer.

Peter Palches, worship coordinator, invites the public to attend, saying, “Lucy is our neighbor, and through her sharing we will be able to relive this incredible moment of time, in this unending river of progress, to hear how through peaceful means an individual’s courage can bring change. It’s one of the great American stories. To have a person like Lucy stand before us will truly bring history to life.”

The public is welcome to attend; the service begins at 11 am.

238 Main Street, Vineyard Haven, ½ block from the Vineyard Haven library.

For more information, call 508-693-8982, or visit uusmv.org.

State and town offices and many businesses will remain closed Wednesday.

Updated 7:45 pm Tuesday, January 27

The blizzard that struck Monday was expected to wane late Tuesday night and begin to pull out to sea Wednesday morning allowing the cleanup to begin. With so much snow left to move, many of Tuesday’s cancellations were extended through Wednesday.

Governor Charlie Baker announced the travel ban would be lifted at midnight. He directed only emergency state employees to return to work Wednesday as the Commonwealth recovers from the full force of the blizzard. The state of emergency order remains in effect.

“The snow will likely continue into the evening, leaving a massive amount of work ahead for Boston and many communities across the Commonwealth,” Governor Baker said.  “While the travel ban will no longer be in effect at midnight tonight, I urge the people of Massachusetts to stay off the roads unless they must travel. It is critical we all work together and use good judgment tonight and throughout tomorrow as road crews work to clean up from this historic blizzard. For those of you that must return to work tomorrow, please be patient and allow plenty of time for your morning commute as we expect the MBTA to experience significant delays.”

On Martha’s Vineyard, Edgartown, Tisbury and Oak Bluffs announced all town offices would remain closed Wednesday.

The Dukes County Courthouse will be closed Wednesday, including District Court, Superior Court, and Probate Court.

A parking ban in Tisbury remains in effect.

Martha’s Vineyard Superintendent of Schools James Weiss announced that school is cancelled Wednesday.

The Steamship Authority has cancelled the scheduled 6 am trip from Vineyard Haven to Woods Hole.

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From left: elves Jonathan Norton, Kathleen Dos Santos, Alicia Teixiera, Chloe Combra and Lydia Carlos perform in "The Elves and the Shoemaker." – Photos by Maria Thibodeau

This past weekend, students from grades 5 through 8 at the Tisbury School put on a captivating performance of the Grimm Brothers’ classic fairytale The Elves and the Shoemaker.

The show featured Lockhart Cobblestone, played by Dougie Norton, as a shoemaker with a kind heart but little money. When he is moved by the misfortune of an old beggar woman, played by Jennyfer Balbino, he gives her his last pair of shoes. Poor Lockhart has only enough leather to make one more pair of shoes, and sets it out to work on the next morning. That’s when the fun ensues. Five quirky but endearing little elves appear; Mortz (Jonathan Norton), Schwartz (Chloe Combra), Hazel (Alicia Teixeira), Gracie (Kathleen Dos Santos), and Studebaker (Lydia Carlos) craft the most fantastic and magical shoes the city of Clankbottom has ever seen. It was an upbeat, whimsical rendition of a classic tale, with a gentle reminder about the importance of kindness.

The students rehearsed diligently twice a week over the past 5 months to ensure a successful show. In an email, Director Denise Lambos said, “They all worked very hard to develop their characters’ personalities. I am very proud of their performances.”

 

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Gannon and Benjamin boatyard in Vineyard Haven was weathering the storm Tuesday. Photo by Steve Myrick.

Updated 2 pm, Tuesday

The first significant blizzard to strike Martha’s Vineyard in years arrived Monday night with driving snow and wind gusts of hurricane force. The light of day Tuesday revealed deep, drifting snow and roadways that were nearly impassable for all but the heaviest vehicles.

A plow works up Main Street in Vineyard Haven.
A plow works up Main Street in Vineyard Haven.

Those who did venture out reported hazardous driving conditions. About 11 am, emergency management officials closed Beach Road between Vineyard Haven and Oak Bluffs, and between Oak Bluffs and Edgartown, due to flooding.

Superintendent of Schools James Weiss announced Tuesday that schools would remain closed Wednesday.

Tisbury and Oak Bluffs also announced town offices and buildings would remain closed Wednesday. A Tisbury parking ban will also remain in effect.

Local and state highway crews were out in force through the night, plowing main roadways. Highway crews focused on main routes, to keep at least one roadway clear for emergency vehicles.

Beach Road was declared closed between Vineyard Haven and Oak Bluffs.
Beach Road was declared closed between Vineyard Haven and Oak Bluffs.

Governor Charlie Baker declared a state of emergency, and instituted a ban on driving that went into effect at midnight. Early Tuesday, two vehicles were off the road and stuck on Edgartown-Vineyard Haven Road at about 7:30 am, causing problems for plow-truck drivers for a short time.

Utility repair crews, including some called in from off-Island before the storm, were out on the roads, but there were very few outages reported. Heavy winds hampered the crew’s ability to use elevated buckets.

NSTAR reported seven customers without power in West Tisbury, and eight customers without power in Oak Bluffs, at 10:45 am Tuesday.

Snow was the icing of the day at the Black Dog Bakery on Water Street in Vineyard Haven.
Snow was the icing of the day at the Black Dog Bakery on Water Street in Vineyard Haven. –Photo by Nicole Jackson

There was some coastal flooding along north- and east-facing shorelines, especially in the usual places vulnerable during storms. Salt spray washed over the sea wall on Sea View Avenue in Oak Bluffs, near Farm Pond. The roadway was flooded and all but impassable on the causeway near the Lagoon Pond drawbridge in Vineyard Haven.

Snow depths varied greatly, because of blowing and drifting snow. In some areas, most of the snow blew away, leaving patches of bare ground. On one side street in Oak Bluffs, one lane was plowed, leaving snow banks of three to five feet on either side.

Latest forecast

Nothing going on at the Steamship Authority.
Nothing going on at the Steamship Authority.

Steady gale-force winds battered the Island overnight and into the morning. At about 9 am, the National Weather Service recorded sustained winds of 31 miles per hour, with gusts up to 58 miles per hour. At about 2 am, sustained winds were measured at 44 miles per hour, with gusts up to 67 miles per hour.

The National Weather Service predicted the worst of the storm will be through this afternoon, then diminish tonight. Northeast winds from 35 to 45 miles per hour are expected to continue, with gusts between 65 and 75 mph through early afternoon.

“All unnecessary travel is discouraged,” the National Weather Service said. “This is a serious, life-threatening storm.”

All quiet at shelter

The Alabama rides out the storm.
The Alabama rides out the storm.

As the wind howled outside, the Tisbury School gymnasium was eerily dark and empty early Tuesday morning, and only a few of the 30 cots looked like they had been slept in last night. In the school cafeteria, the volunteers outnumbered the evacuees. Only two people sought shelter last night, according to volunteer Brian Kennedy of Oak Bluffs. “We have 11 volunteers from the Island and four Red Cross staff on hand,” Mr. Kennedy said. “We fed eight off-Island utility crews earlier in the morning. The crews were notified that conditions were too dangerous to go out, and went back to their hotel until further instructions.”

Mr. Kennedy said the volunteers had just completed a call with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), and were told all of Nantucket had lost power and it would be days before power is restored: “We’ve been very lucky that the power has stayed on for the most part. We’re in a lot better shape than Nantucket, that’s for sure.”

The shelter will remain open until 10 am, Wednesday.

Kept busy

Emergency responders were kept busy throughout the morning responding to reports of stuck vehicles and house alarms.

Firefighters were alerted to a call of a carbon monoxide alarm at a house on North Neck Road on Chappaquiddick. The 911 dispatcher reported that the responding firefighter had found the road impassable “so he’s going to walk in.”

About one-half hour later, the firefighter reported back, “Nothing showing at that residence.”

An anxious husband called 911 to report that his wife had left her vehicle and was on skis in the Long Point section of West Tisbury, intending to ski to the caretaker’s cottage at the Trustees property, but had texted him to say she felt like going to sleep. Rescue personnel responded, battling deep snow, and later reported that the woman had arrived.

Island prepared

Storm preparations began in earnest on Monday.

beach house shop windowFollowing a meeting of of Island public-safety officials called to discuss the approaching blizzard, Martha’s Vineyard Superintendent of Schools James Weiss announced that all afterschool activities were canceled, and that school was canceled Tuesday.

Edgartown and Tisbury announced parking bans on town streets.

The Steamship Authority announced it was operating on a trip-by-trip basis, and would suspend service on Tuesday. By 6 pm the boats had ceased to run.

Shelters were quiet.
Shelters were quiet.

As the storm began to intensify, Island residents began receiving automated calls as part of the county’s Code Red warning system. The recorded message advised Islanders what to do to prepare, and announced the opening of a shelter at the Tisbury School gym.

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Not need to seek shelter at Island Alpaca farm in Oak Bluffs. Why does this alpaca appear to be smiling?

As the wind howled outside, the Tisbury School gymnasium was eerily dark and empty early Tuesday morning, and only a few of the 30 cots looked like they had been slept in last night. In the school cafeteria, the volunteers outnumbered the evacuees. Only two people sought shelter last night, according to volunteer Brian Kennedy of Oak Bluffs. “We have 11 volunteers from the Island and four Red Cross staff on hand,” Mr. Kennedy said. “We fed eight off-Island utility crews earlier in the morning. The crews were notified that conditions were too dangerous to go out, and went back to their hotel until further instructions.”

Mr. Kennedy said the volunteers had just completed a call with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), and were told all of Nantucket had lost power and it would be days before power is restored: “We’ve been very lucky that the power has stayed on for the most part. We’re in a lot better shape than Nantucket, that’s for sure.”

Mr. Kennedy said the shelter will remain open until further notice.

On Monday, emergency management directors in the six Island towns finalized plans to provide emergency shelter Monday at the Tisbury School.

Island emergency management directors met Monday to plan for the approaching storm.
Island emergency management directors met Monday to plan for the approaching storm.

The Tisbury School at 40 West William Street was used to service all Island residents who needed shelter. Emergency officials decided it would be best to consolidate staff and services in one shelter, rather than open a shelter in each Island town, as they have done in the past.

The Tisbury School opened at 6 pm, Monday night, and was ready to handle a limited number of house pets. Emergency management directors had a plan to open a second shelter if needed.

Emergency officials advised those in need of shelter who cannot travel to call 9-1-1, or their local police department.

Red Cross officials stressed that anyone coming to the shelter should bring medications, and any emergency medical equipment, such as oxygen cylinders. They also encouraged people to bring a change of clothing, any special foods they will need, toiletries, pillows, and blankets.

If bringing a pet, also bring pet food, bowls, medical records including rabies certification, leashes, collars and ID tags.

Emergency officials were more concerned with the probability of high winds and frigid temperatures, than the amount of snow expected.

“There will be drifting snow, and with the extended period of snow it’s going to be tough to keep up with it,” Edgartown emergency management director Peter Shemeth said Monday. “My concern is more with the velocity of the wind, wires coming down, and extended power outages.”

Emergency officials sent at least one message through the Code Red emergency notification system, which automatically dials home phone numbers. They caution people not to be alarmed by the recorded message, but to pay attention to the latest emergency information. Some residents reported receiving multiple messages

The Vineyard Haven Steamship Authority terminal was shuttered Tuesday.

Updated 7 pm, Tuesday

The Steamship Authority announced the 6 am, Wednesday trip from Martha’s Vineyard to Woods Hole is canceled.

All other boats are scheduled to run on a trip by trip basis. The 6 am departure from Woods Hole and the 7 am departure from Martha’s Vineyard are currently expected to run but travelers are advised to check with the boatline.

Service was suspended all day Tuesday.

Ferry service will resume as soon as the wind and sea conditions improve.

The Steamship Authority advised customers to check the boatline website steamshipauthority.com, for further announcements regarding the resumption of ferry service.

Individual trip cancellations may be viewed on the Steamship Authority’s Current Conditions Page at: http://www.steamshipauthority.com/ssa/opschoice.cfm

Menemsha was not a blizzard of activity Tuesday. Photo by Rich Saltzberg.

Updated 9:20 am, Wednesday

Schools cancelled Wednesday

Martha’s Vineyard Superintendent of Schools James Weiss announced that school is cancelled Wednesday.

Oak Bluffs, Tisbury, Edgartown, Chilmark offices will remain closed Wednesday

Edgartown, Oak Bluffs, Chilmark and Tisbury town offices will remain closed through Wednesday.

Edgartown District Court closed Wednesday

County offices will be closed Wednesday

Tisbury Vision Planning workshop cancelled

The joint meeting of the Tisbury planning board and selectmen at 7 pm, Wednesday at the Tisbury Senior Center to provide an update on the town’s vision-planning process has been cancelled.

ACE MV classes cancelled Wednesday

Chilmark Library closed

The Chilmark Library will remain closed on Wednesday. The Chowder and a Movie program scheduled for noon and the Library Board of Trustees scheduled for 3 pm are cancelled.

Tisbury parking ban remains

Tisbury’s parking ban will remain in effect through 6 pm, Wednesday.

Stop and Shop weathers storm

The Stop and Shop In Vineyard Haven and Edgartown remained open Tuesday.

SSA cancels 6 am, Vineyard Haven to Woods Hole boat 

All others boats are on a trip by trip basis.

Vineyard Medical Care walk-in will remain closed Wednesday

Tisbury shelter opened

The Salvation Army and the Red Cross will operate a shelter at the Tisbury School gym until 10 am, Wednesday.

Martha’s Vineyard Hospital open for essential services only

Martha’s Vineyard Hospital will provide only essential and emergency services through Tuesday. Patients with appointments are asked to contact their provider directly regarding services on Wednesday. In the event of an emergency, please dial 911.

The Hospital’s main number is 508-693-0410.

Power outages

Residents are advised to report down power lines, Call NSTAR at 800-592-2000. Call NSTAR at 800-592-2000 to report a power outage.

Be cautious with vents

Clear home heating vents to protect against potential carbon monoxide hazards.

East Chop Drive closed

East Chop Drive will be closed from 4 pm, Monday until 6 pm, Wednesday between Brewster and Munroe Avenue due to concerns of erosion.

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This weekend marked the the 29th annual Big Chili Contest, better known as Chilifest, at the Portuguese-American Club in Oak Bluffs. For almost three decades the popular 21-plus festival, hosted by MVY Radio, has spiced up the winter with a good time while bringing in thousands of dollars for the Red Stocking Fund which provides food, clothing, and toys to Island children during the holiday season.

Hundreds of off-Island visitors descended on the Vineyard for the event, despite the wet conditions. The local taxi company, Stagecoach Taxi, reported that guests were being dropped off at the contest as early as 9:30am. The early morning boats were packed with visitors from Boston, Falmouth, and beyond. The rain didn’t stop the party; the line was almost at the door at noon – with still four more hours to enjoy the festivities.

From left: Mauricio Gomez, Colette Kurelja, and Stephanie Gomez enjoy sampling chili. – Photo by Angelina Godbout
From left: Mauricio Gomez, Colette Kurelja, and Stephanie Gomez enjoy sampling chili. – Photo by Angelina Godbout

Island restaurants and layman chili chefs prepared countless batches of their favorite recipes for a chance to win in one of several professional and amateur categories while contest attendees made the rounds tasting. Chili competitors included The Ritz (Oak Bluffs), The Black Dog (Vineyard Haven), Quicks Hole Tavern (Woods Hole), and Quahog Republic (Falmouth), among many others.

The costume clad attendees, in Mexican ponchos, sombreros, and festive masks, danced to the music of the Mariachi Mexico Lindo Band, Taunton-based cover band the Baja Brothers, and local favorite Johnny Hoy and the Bluefish.

The competition categories include “Is It Really Chili?,” “Farthest Traveled,” “Best Presentation,” “Steve Jordan Memorial Hottest Chili” (Mr. Jordan retired from the contest to judge after winning the category 18 straight years), “Best Professional” and “Best Amateur” chili. MVY also awarded a first time Spirit Award which went to attendee Mo Cheeks who donned several different costumes throughout the day including denim cutoff shorts and an orange womens bathing suit.

The crowd gathered under a tent at the Portuguese American Club in Oak Bluffs. – Photo by Angelina Godbout
The crowd gathered under a tent at the Portuguese American Club in Oak Bluffs. – Photo by Angelina Godbout

The winners:

Best professional chili, third place: The Ritz.

Best professional chili, second place: The Black Dog.

Best professional chili, first place: Quahog Republic of Falmouth (by a “slim margin”).

Farthest traveled chili: Adam Sanders for his amateur chili from Worcester.

Best veggie chili: Quicks Hole Tavern of Woods Hole.

Best Presentation: Jim Pringle and Alan Northcott for their amateur chili, which used local Hopps Farm hops and ale in their recipe.

Is that really chili?:  New Moon Magick Enchanted Chocolates won for their chili chocolate.

Hottest chili: The Lookout Tavern.

Best amateur chili, third place: Edgartown Fire Department.

Best amateur chili, second place: Bob Costello and his official chili.

Best amateur chili, first place: Bill Donovan and Brian Lucier of Wild Willy’s Ass Kickin’ Chili.

Jenny Johnson of  NESN’s Dining Playbook also announced her personal favorites, which were awarded with cash prizes.

Third place, $200: The Lookout Tavern

Second place, $300: Bill Donovan and Brian Lucier of Wild Willy’s Ass Kickin’ Chili.

Third place, $500: Quahog Republic of Falmouth.

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Despite a roster depleted by illness the boys basketball team prevailed, 53-38.

Tim Roberts battles in the paint with Somerset Berkley's Austin Rodrigues (left) and Logan Smith. – Photos by Ralph Stewart

The  Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School boys varsity basketball team overcame both the flu and a chippy Somerset Berkley Regional High School squad to win going away by a score of 53-38 Friday night at the Sancy Pachico Gym in Oak Bluffs.

Senior Tim Roberts, with 16 points, and freshman Cole Houston, 15 points, led a second-half comeback that featured clingwrap defense to seal the win.

The Vineyarders (7-4, 4-1 in Eastern Athletic Conference (EAC) play) outscored the Raiders (5-6, 1-5 EAC) by a 32-15 margin.

Senior starters Matt Stone and Ben Poole did not play because of illness.

The Vineyarders next journey to Weston High School for a 5:30 game on Wednesday, Jan. 28.