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Director Mike Nichols, right, died on Wednesday in New York. He is seen in this photo with Richard Paradise on stage at the M.V. Film Center this past summer. — File photo by Tony Omer

Director Mike Nichols, a longtime Island seasonal resident and husband of Diane Sawyer, passed away suddenly in New York on Wednesday, according to an announcement by ABC News president James Goldston.

A full obituary will follow.

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The Clippers win 2-1.

Martha's Vineyard fans filled three busses and cheered on their team to a first goal to lead Norwell just minutes into the Division 3 South final game at Taunton. –Photo by Ralph Stewart

Updated at 4:45 pm Saturday.

For about 25 minutes on a sunny but cold Saturday in Taunton, the Martha’s Vineyard varsity soccer team led the Norwell Clippers 1-0, and visions of a trip to the state championships danced in the heads of the scores of Vineyard fans who filled the stands to cheer on their team in the Division 3 South finals.

Jimmy DiMattia, Andy DiMattia, Daniel Costello, Cooper Wilson are on the MV football team and took one of the three fan busses to Taunton. – Photo by Edie Prescott
Jimmy DiMattia, Andy DiMattia, Daniel Costello, Cooper Wilson are on the MV football team and took one of the three fan busses to Taunton. – Photo by Edie Prescott

Members of the MVRHS football team, who had triumphed over Bellingham on Friday night at home, were some of the supporters who arrived in three fan busses. Andy DiMattia told the times, “We came to support the school, see how they’re doing. They’ve come pretty far in the playoffs so it’s good to show some support.” Cooper Wilson added, “They’re always out there to see us play so we thought we’d return the favor.”

With just over 27 minutes remaining in the first half, Ben Poole scored for the Vineyard, and the team remained in the lead until Norwell’s Connor Horan kicked a goal with two minutes left to play, leaving the teams tied at half time.

The teams remained tied through the second half. With less than two minutes left in the game, Clipper Ty Studley scored the second and winning goal for Norwell, assisted by Connor Horan.

It was a hard fought match.  Vineyard coaches Ryan White and Esteban Aranzabe told MVTimes correspondent Edie Prescott that they believed the better team had not prevailed.

“I’m proud of this team, said Coach Aranzabe, “And I applaud them for an exceptional season.”

In this file photo, the U.S. Coast Guard Station Menemsha color guard leads the 2013 Veterans Day parade on its way to Ocean Park. —Photo by Ralph Stewart

Veterans Day honors military veterans and commemorates the German signing of the Armistice that ended World War One, at the 11th hour, on the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918. Federal and state agencies will be closed on Tuesday, November 11, in observance of the holiday.

To honor men and women who have served and are currently serving their country in the military, Islanders will celebrate Veterans Day in several ceremonies and events on Tuesday.

Veterans Day activities start with the display of flags at the Avenue of Flags in Oak Grove Cemetery, Vineyard Haven. Volunteers are needed to put flags up, starting at 7:30 am, and to take them down, starting at 3 pm.

For the fourth year in a row, the Department of Veterans Affairs and Veterans Day National Committee have designated the Oak Bluffs Veterans Day Parade as a regional site for the observance of the holiday. Dukes County director of veterans services Jo Ann Murphy and Peter Herrmann, of Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 9261 and the parade’s organizer for many years, were responsible for submitting the application for the designation of Oak Bluffs as one of 67 regional sites nationwide and the only one in Massachusetts.

The Veterans Day Parade steps off from Nancy’s Restaurant in Oak Bluffs at 10:45 am and proceeds to Ocean Park for a brief ceremony. Felix “Butch” Banis, the Veterans of Foreign Wars District 17 Service Officer, will be the guest speaker.

At 1:45 pm Windemere Nursing and Rehabilitation Center will hold a reception open to the public to honor resident veterans.

On November 14 at 5:30 pm the Martha’s Vineyard Hebrew Center will hold a Shabbat Veterans Day service at which veterans, merchant mariners, and others involved in past and present military service will be honored.

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Aquinnah

Chilmark

Edgartown

Oak Bluffs

Tisbury

West Tisbury

Gosnold

Island Totals

U.S. Senate

x

Edward J. Markey (D)

171

403

1063

1205

1180

1112

27

5134

Brian J. Herr (R)

22

98

607

556

422

286

19

1991

Governor

x

Baker and Polito (R)

40

136

731

677

516

369

24

2469

Coakley and Kerrigan (D)

147

344

894

1037

1051

984

20

4457

Falchuk and Jennings (United Independent)

6

16

41

57

34

35

1

189

Lively and Saunders (I)

3

2

14

10

8

7

44

McCormick and Post (I)

3

5

16

17

19

16

76

Attorney General

x

Maura Healey (D)

166

402

1031

1188

1163

1096

24

5046

John B. Miller (R)

25

96

618

557

420

284

20

2000

Secretary of State

x

William Francis Galvin (D)

160

386

1153

1258

1182

1090

25

5229

David D’ArCangelo (R)

15

77

441

430

314

223

17

1500

Daniel L. Factor (Green-Rainbow)

16

27

54

56

89

66

2

308

Treasurer

x

Deborah B. Goldberg (D)

143

336

920

1025

1025

969

17

4418

Michael James Heffernan (R)

25

105

628

581

436

301

24

2076

Ian T. Jackson (Green-Rainbow)

18

40

55

75

100

76

1

364

Auditor

x

Suzanne M. Bump (D)

144

339

934

1060

1016

967

21

4460

Patricia S. Saint Aubin (R)

20

101

571

531

406

276

20

1905

MK Merelice (Green-Rainbow)

14

36

69

76

105

71

1

371

Representative in Congress

x

William Richard Keating (D)

163

405

1064

1201

1168

1108

22

5109

John C. Chapman (R)

26

93

592

552

423

289

22

1975

Governor’s Council, First District

x

Joseph C. Ferreira (D)

145

382

1126

1229

1193

1029

29

5104

Senator in General Court

x

Daniel A. Wolf (D)

164

399

1073

1196

1193

1128

23

5153

Ronald R. Beaty, Jr. (R)

20

90

544

513

376

234

20

1777

Representative in General Court

x

Timothy R. Madden (D)

166

425

1210

1333

1300

1151

32

5585

District Attorney

x

Michael D. O’Keefe (R)

53

176

869

814

669

487

24

3068

Richard G. Barry (D)

130

303

741

883

868

828

16

3753

Register of Probate

x

Elizabeth J. Herrmann (R)

101

295

1172

1142

1038

795

35

4543

County Treasurer

x

Noreen Mavro Flanders (unenrolled)

123

362

1121

1189

1170

951

32

4825

County Commissioner

x

John S. Alley (D)

132

329

940

1064

1037

886

26

4388

x

Leon Arthur Brathwaite (D)

115

281

785

870

881

774

26

3706

x

Tristan Israel (Unenrolled)

136

326

936

955

1051

871

26

4275

x

David Jeffrey Holway (D)

106

265

835

831

861

730

24

3628

x

Christine Todd (write-in)

12

23

71

86

98

290

x

Leonard Jason, Jr. (write in)

11

21

70

60

90

252

x

Gretchen Underwood

7

14

27

50

40

138

Martha’s Vineyard Commission

x

Clarence A. Barnes, III

134

358

1147

1149

1139

957

4884

x

Christina Brown

110

307

1045

959

938

837

4196

x

Joshua Seth Goldstein

104

286

825

863

885

768

3731

x

Ernest Douglas Sederholm

103

314

847

865

866

808

3803

x

Linda Bauer Sibley

115

305

838

877

922

805

3862

x

Robert McMillen Doyle

105

289

779

808

869

736

3586

x

Fred J. Hancock

93

244

815

950

824

678

3604

x

Abraham L. Seiman

91

232

759

868

778

652

3380

x

James Vercruysse

144

293

786

839

851

744

3657

Up-Island School Committee

x

Jeffrey “Skipper” Manter

116

309

939

1364

x

Michael Marcus

95

279

784

1158

Roxanne Ackerman (write-in)

35

26

29

90

x

Kate DeVane (write-in)

21

39

349

409

x

Robert Lionette (write-in)

24

66

93

183

x

Theresa Manning (write-in)

72

75

227

374

West Tisbury Town Moderator

x

Daniel Waters

1304

1304

Chilmark Proposition 2.5 exemption (Road Repairs)

x

Yes

308

308

No

110

110

Question 1 (Gasoline Tax)

x

Yes

90

211

844

827

748

558

17

3278

No

93

273

783

887

788

763

27

3587

Question 2 (Bottle Returns)

Yes

90

279

576

626

590

665

18

2826

x

No

106

222

1092

1136

1023

725

27

4304

Question 3 (Repeal Casinos)

Yes

127

379

904

839

928

857

30

4034

x

No

68

118

750

900

674

516

15

3026

Question 4 (Earned Sick Time)

x

Yes

120

288

866

969

1001

855

25

4099

No

52

159

762

749

583

501

12

2806

Question 5 (Pilgrim Nuclear Plant) (not binding)

x

Yes

135

344

1004

1097

1129

984

21

4693

No

28

72

414

430

327

239

11

1510

Voter turnout:

Total votes cast:

200

511

1716

1819

1657

1437

7340

Percentage of electorate that voted:

53.8

54.5

52.1

48.9

49.3

57.8

52.73

Last year, in an attempt to curb East Chop drive erosion, Oak Bluffs selectmen closed the northbound lane between Brewster and Munroe avenues. — File photo by Ralph Stewart

Oak Bluffs Fire Chief John Rose announced that East Chop Drive will be closed to vehicle traffic between Brewster Avenue and Monroe Avenue from 5 pm, Saturday until 7 am, Monday morning due to a storm that will bring high winds and rain to Martha’s Vineyard over the weekend.

The National Weather Service has issued a high wind warning now in effect until 5 pm, Sunday. Winds are predicted to blow 25 to 35 miles per hour out of the north with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest gusts are expected late Saturday night into Sunday morning. Power lines, trees and tree limbs will likely be downed by these winds, according to the National Weather Service said.

The crumbling corniche that wraps around East Chop bluffs and overlooks Nantucket Sound has a long history of erosion-related closures. It was closed for two years after hurricane Bob in 1991. The seaward lane was closed in November 2012 as a result of erosion from Superstorm Sandy. Three months later, winter storm Nemo caused damage that closed the road entirely for two weeks. One lane remained closed until late June of 2013, when it was reopened to reduce traffic on the alternate routes that cut through residential areas of East Chop.

Angus (in front) protects Frankie, his new little sister.
The Dogfather, with Paula.
The Dogfather, with Paula.

Tom Shelby, who has trained dogs and their owners on Martha’s Vineyard and in New York City, answers readers’ questions about their problematic pooches. This week, the Dogfather counsels the owners of a noisy new puppy and Tyler, who’s moving his pooches to VH.

Dear Dogfather,

Angus (in back) watches his new little house mate, Frankie, who can get sort of noisy.
Angus (in back) watches his new little house mate, Frankie, who can get sort of noisy.

Thanks to your advice, Angus and his little sister Frankie (who came home to us a few weeks ago) are best buds. They play rough, snuggle in Angus’s crate, and pal around all day. Frankie is more vocal than Angus when they play and walk around. For instance, she will “complain” and sounds as if she’s walking begrudgingly while trying to keep up with her pack, or growl and yip during play. Should we be discouraging this vocal behavior? Or keep letting her express herself?

Thanks!

Alex and JD

Dear Alex and JD,

Delighted to hear how well things are going with Angus and Frankie. I refer to dogs that bark too much as their being overly verbal. That usually refers to dogs that bark for attention, or at the window when someone has the audacity to walk by your house. Then there are the dogs that give the driver acoustic trauma when seeing anything while driving in the car, or the hapless barkers who suffer from separation anxiety when left alone. These being some of the examples of overly verbal canines, I don’t think they apply to Frankie. From what you described it sounds to me like play excitement barking. Paula, my poodle, will sometimes jump straight up and bark on the sighting of another dog, basically saying, “Oh boy, a possible romp with one of my own kind!”

When dogs play, they chase each other and play fight, and as often as not they verbalize when playing. My Doberman, Michelle, had a best friend, a German Shepherd named Daisy. They played often and sounded like two lions fighting to the death. When Michelle had a tug of war with a rope toy with my other dog Tri, it was a 90-pound Doberman against a 17-pound Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. She could have easily ripped it out of Tri’s mouth, but didn’t because she enjoyed the game, and you should have heard the decibel level of the growling coming from both of them.

Alex, if you tried to stop the verbalizing while she’s playing, Frankie would probably relate your correction to her playing, not her growling. Playing, to her — as with many other dogs — includes growling.

However, I’m a little confused when you mentioned that she “will complain and sounds like she’s walking begrudgingly while trying to keep up with her pack.” That almost sounds like she’s experiencing some physical discomfort while walking. You might want to keep an eye on that.

As I’ve said before, the best you can do to have dogs get along is interfere as little as possible, let them work it out.

Enjoy the extended family,

The Dogfather

Dear Dogfather,

I will be moving from Oak Bluffs to Vineyard Haven at the end of the month. I have two dogs. Will this be stressful to them,and if so, how do I lessen the stress?

-Tyler

Dear Tyler,

Will moving from Oak Bluffs to Vineyard Haven stress these dogs out?
Will moving from Oak Bluffs to Vineyard Haven stress these dogs out?

I read somewhere years ago that moving ranked with death and divorce in terms of trauma. That of course pertained to humans as the article went on to explain that a large percentage of people have to move because of something catastrophic such as a job loss or cancer diagnosis. Countless times I’ve heard, “My dog’s behavior is regressing; she started destructive chewing again like when she was a puppy, or peeing in the house,” or whatever, for no reason at all.

But there’s always a reason, and it’s my job to find out what’s causing the dog’s aberrant behavior. Dogs are very aware and sensitive to the vibe of the household. The sadness of a wife whose husband passes away may create enough anxiety in the family dog to cause it to start nervously chewing on furniture.

So if you have to move because of a catastrophic change in your life, your dog is likely to be depressed or a basket case before you even move. Now add to that the fact that your dog can’t even conceive of the concept of “moving.” What the dog will perceive is the disassembling of her den, of her sanctuary, with no understanding of “why.”

When my wife Jaye and I decided to move to MV to retire it was all good. Yet Jaye cried for most of the 5 hour drive from NY just because of the trauma of the momentous change in our lives, leaving our beautiful house we had lived in for 30 years and being so far away from our children, friends and familiar environs.

So Tyler, even assuming that your move is positive, all your dogs see is your stress from the actual mundane hassles of moving all your stuff,  and their comfortable home being obliterated.

So what to do? If possible, before you move, bring the dogs to the new house, making sure they’re hungry, and feed them there. Play with them there. Walk them in their new neighborhood. Do this as often as you can. If you can’t actually get into the house, then familiarize them with the area around the house as much as possible. And when you do move make sure that their beds and bowls and toys are in the new digs immediately, not in a storage facility to be picked up later.

Best of luck,

 

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The moon a bright scimitar last night

o’er the Halloween creatures and town lights.

Dinghies and dredges await the dawn,

braided lines hold bows gently on moorings

lettered with draggers’ names,

culling boards all painted industrial grey,

and nets draped below like tatted lace,

clean still of eelgrass and eels and fish we can’t name.

Rubber boots and mitts ready to shuck

at morning light. Let the frigid sea splash and leak

down our shins and to our feet

splayed against the pitch and yaw

of the swell and salty chop-

rich harvest before us, fair wind at our backs.

Clark Myers is an active member of the poetry community on Martha’s Vineyard. He lives in Vineyard Haven.

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Ellie Bates, "Being a Poet" at The Unitarian Universalist Society.

Ellie Bates, poet and educator, read from her body of work at the Unitarian Universalist Church on Sunday. —Photo by Michael Cummo

As the Sunday morning sun warmed the wooden pews inside the Unitarian Universalist Society’s intimate parish hall, local poet and educator Ellie Bates spoke to a rapt and responsive audience of her life’s long journey of “Being A Poet” and the experiences which inspired the poems she has “left as milestones in the continued search to get it right.”

At the opening of Sunday’s service, following her instinct as a schoolteacher, Ms. Bates spoke directly to the young members of the congregation. “What does poetry mean to you?” she asked. She was met with the poignant answers of young poets:

“You put the words down on paper just the way you feel.”

“Sometimes it’s just an experience.”

“Sometimes it’s funny.”

For Ms. Bates, the creative urge came early. “My own writing career began in Ms. Swanson’s first grade classroom,” she said. Then, the honor of being displayed on the class bulletin board validated the bourgeoning writer and set her on a path of both writing and teaching. After an education consisting of “the masters: Frost, Twain, Dickinson, and Steinbeck,” Ms. Bates marinated in the inspiration of Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and Joni Mitchell. She landed her first teaching job in “an all black school in Boston, where I knew I had to give the students the voices of Martin Luther King, Maya Angelou, and Langston Hughes… I wanted them to know, writing takes courage, but it also has  power.”

In her own poetry of the time, Ms. Bates dealt with themes of hope, renewal, and personal relationships. In one poem, she wrote: “Hope is not a thing of feathers/it is a rudder in the  strangest Sea….”

Ms. Bates developed a strong conviction of the link between cultural identity, personal empowerment, and the impetus to express one’s own story through the literary arts.  Identifying her own need to learn more about indigenous peoples and their rich oral  traditions, Ms. Bates took part in a teacher’s workshop with the Navajo and Hopi on their  reservations in the southwest, and earned a National Endowment for the Humanities  research grant to further pursue Native American studies at the University of Texas. She became active in The Boston Writing Project, and later, in local community and educational writing cooperatives such as Pathways Arts Project, The Cleveland House Poets, and The Martha’s Vineyard Poets Collective.

On the Island, as The Edgartown School’s Reading Coordinator, Ms. Bates enhanced the curriculum by designing creative literacy initiatives which used reading, writing, and dramatic arts to expand students’ understanding of archeology, oral history, and indigenous cross-cultural studies.

Ann Hollister, a colleague at Edgartown School and a longtime friend, gave the introduction at Sunday’s service, saying, “Ellie brought with her the ideal that reluctant readers needed a community to thrive, and specialists to assist. We wrote and worked together for years in this spirit.”

While Ms. Bates was busy creating experiential learning projects crossing disciplinary mediums for her students, she worked consistently over the years on her own creative development, combing through intimate themes of infertility and, later, parenthood. “That’s perhaps why the poems about my children are so dear to me,” she said. She shared her poem “Daughter Leaving,” reading: “Like mist on the lagoon/You rise/ Breaking free from the night…” The poem garnered collective “ahhs” from the Vineyard Haven audience.

The Island landscape and the imagery of nature plays a leading role in Ms. Bates’s work. From her poem “Attachments,” “Like the life in the ocean/ I trust symbiotic relations/ A balance of silent actions” to the poem “Tsaile” from her time in the southwest, “Where does the water go when it flows from the canyon?/ Here at Tsaile it forms the crossroads of my life,” Ms. Bates has used the language of the environment to express her own life’s quandaries and triumphs. “I had to get out of my sorrowful self and be with the beauty of nature –– the power of nature renewed my faith in the moment,” she said.

Though Ms. Bates is not a member of the Unitarian Universalist Society herself, worship coordinator Peter Palches enthusiastically welcomed her as a guest to the congregation. “Each of us through our thoughts and feelings needs to work out our own religion –– we look around, we talk to each other, we ask questions, but we attend to our own spiritual path,” Mr. Palches said. “This is at the heart of being a poet, and this is why we have asked Ellie to be with us today.”

While Ms. Bates often spoke with a tremble of emotion in her voice, it was when she recited her poetry that an unmistakable strength and steadiness shone through. Whether teaching literature or weaving words herself, Ms. Bates has followed what seems central to her purpose as a poet and educator. “I want to turn away from darkness and turn towards the light,” she said. “And embrace a community which helps me see that light, and to write poems and speak them, which may help to heal others.”

“Being a Poet” by Ellie Bates was part of the on-going series on ‘Creativity’ offered by The Unitarian Universalist Society of Martha’s Vineyard. For more information, visit uusmv.org or call 508-693-8982.

Keya Guimarães is a documentary filmmaker and screenwriter and a new Times correspondent. She moved to Martha’s Vineyard a year ago from Kauai and lives with her family in Chilmark.

F. Charles “Chuck” Froelicher, of Denver, Colorado, and West Chop, an educator and conservationist who set an example of principal, integrity, and public service for all who knew him, died October 17, 2014, surrounded by his family in his Colorado home. He was 89.

A full obituary with service information will follow in a future edition of The Times.