Thursday, July 16, 2020
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Time to speak up

“We can’t recover from this history until we deal with it.” –Bryan Stevenson, Equal Justice Initiative  I don’t think it was until I stood under a lynching tree in Selma, Ala., that I really stepped into...

Remembering Kent State

May 5, 1970, I was walking from my dorm down a causeway to the campus at Rochester Institute of Technology. A friend coming the other way put up the alarm: “Have you heard! They...

Connecting the dots: The pandemic and climate change

This week, on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Jane Goodall, the famous and compassionate scientist/environmentalist, commented wistfully during an appearance on the PBS NewsHour: “We are all interconnected, and if we don’t get...

School lunch during a pandemic

Furnishing lunch for kids stuck at home during the pandemic may sound simple, but for remotely working parents it isn’t always. Time to prepare meals for kids, let alone providing activities for them, can...

Working toward a future resilient MV

I would like to take a moment to share some of my reflections over the past few weeks as I have watched COVID-19 rip through the world and begin to descend on our beloved...

Girl on the Run

“Girl on the Run,” is inspired by and commemorates the 100 years of suffrage and International Women's Day, March 8.  The 100 years since suffrage have spawned amazing changes in America for women. As with...

Going to New York

Coronavirus, COVID-19, is causing travel to come to a halt across the world. Schools around the globe are canceling trips domestically and internationally in fear of students contracting the virus. After Martha’s Vineyard Regional...

We found a way to house us all

We all share that profoundly insightful skill of a Monday morning quarterback. However, we all also share a very unclear and often unreliable crystal ball.  I served for ten years in a leadership role of...

The Aging of Martha’s Vineyard: A strategy for a healthy future

In previous essays, we described the aging phenomenon in the U.S., and reported on how it affects Martha’s Vineyard. Between 2010 and 2016 on the Vineyard, there was a 63 percent growth of the...

Travel to and from the Vineyard in 2040

Vineyard residents and visitors today are whisked between the Vineyard and the mainland in as little as 12 minutes, thanks to more than a dozen smaller-size passenger electric and hybrid fast passenger ferries that...

How we saved Martha’s Vineyard by saving our clams

I am thankful that the clam harvest is so good this year. The past 30 years have seen a decline and rebirth of clams for Island residents. I think it all started with the...

In 2030, more farms, more food

Ten more working farms grace our fields and roads. Each new farm includes several affordable homes — not tiny homes — but modest guesthouse-sized structures, ranging from 700 to 1,100 square feet, with net-zero...

We became an aging-friendly Island

My name is Esther. It’s 2030; I’m 80 years old — like lots of Vineyard residents these days — and I treasure living in this aging-friendly Island community because: We’ve come a long...

Ward Just: ‘A gentleman to the end’

I count myself as among the very fortunate to have been a close friend of Ward Just. He was a lot of things: astute, observant, wry, witty, and self-deprecating. He was also a gentleman...

The lives they led, part three

We’ve decided to make “The lives they led” an annual celebration of the lives of Islanders who died during the year. We have included those who lived for at least some time on Martha’s...

We adapted to climate change and sea level rise

It is late December 2050, and we on Martha’s Vineyard have seen so many changes over the past three decades! Back in 2020, I was finishing up a 30-plus-year career as a coastal land...

Healthcare at Martha’s Vineyard Hospital, 2030

Updated, 5 pm, Monday, Jan. 13 As we turn the page on another decade and welcome the year 2030, we’ve made tremendous progress in the health and wellness of MVY — thanks to community partnerships,...

We averted an economic crisis by turning food waste into black gold

Few foresaw the waste crisis that plagued Massachusetts in the 2030s. By 2029, global recycling markets had collapsed, and every Massachusetts landfill was closed. All state waste was exported to distant places like Alabama...

Let’s all celebrate the anniversary of our historic Vexit! 

What a difference it has made, since the Vineyard officially exited the United States and joined Canada. The free healthcare has been wonderful, as has the affordable college for our kids. And our fellow...

The Food Pantry becomes less relevant

The 2020’s will be a banner decade for food equity and community development here on Martha's Vineyard. While our ability to serve Islanders in need with healthy, wholesome food will undoubtedly increase, it’s my...