Chappy ferry changes start next week

Chappaquiddick ferry owner Peter Wells told selectmen at their meeting Tuesday that he expects to begin using only the smaller of his two ferry boats early next week.

With the larger ferry hauled out for maintenance, longer waiting lines are expected. The town will implement a temporary plan to mark off a waiting lane on the right side of North Water Street, where cars can wait when the line backs up past Daggett Avenue.

Mr. Wells said he spent some time with town officials on Tuesday considering alternatives to the plan outlined at the October 3 selectmen’s meeting.

“I did have some second thoughts,” Mr. Wells said. “We looked over all our choices, and we’re going to stick with our original idea.”

The highway department will relocate a handicapped parking spot and a loading zone on the left side of North Water Street, to accommodate through traffic. They will put up new signs and add temporary lane markings to guide motorists.

In other action, selectmen accepted the resignation of Glenn Carpenter from the library board of trustees, and agreed to advertise for the position. Selectmen will appoint someone to serve until next spring’s town election.

In other action, selectmen accepted the resignation of Glenn Carpenter from the library board of trustees, and agreed to advertise for the position. Selectmen will appoint someone to serve until next spring’s town election.

Also Tuesday, Danielle Pendergraft outlined plans to host a private fall celebration for third and fifth grade students at her South Water Street home on October 22. Ms. Pendergraft originally intended to ask selectmen to cordon off the street.

“Originally we thought we may have to close the road,” police chief Tony Bettencourt told selectmen. “We’ll leave one lane open. She’s going to have a detail there. If I had to, I could close the road but I don’t think we’ll need to.”

The lane restriction will be in effect from 5 to 8 pm on Saturday, October 22.

Clair Hall came before the board to address some issues she said were important to her. She told selectmen she opposed expanding the downtown historic district. “Real people live here,” Ms. Hall said. “I don’t want the town telling me what I can and what I can’t do with my property.”

She also minced few words in telling selectmen she opposed an idea floated briefly earlier this year to relocate the town’s senior center.

“We surely have one of the most beautiful senior centers in the United States,” she said. “Every senior in this town will vote against you. We’re much older and wiser than you.”

Chairman Art Smadbeck assured Ms. Hall that the town is not considering relocation any longer.