Headed for a reckoning

4

To the Editor:

I picked up a copy of the Mueller Report ($9 at Amazon) and found a ready parallel in history:

On Saturday, June 17, 1972, burglars broke into the Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate in Washington, D.C. This led to President Nixon’s resignation.

On Saturday June 17, 2017, President Trump requested White House counsel Don McGahn terminate Robert Mueller as special counsel. McGahn opted to resign, then changed his mind.

The effort to silence Mueller was the most egregious incident of obstruction of justice cited in the report.

Now that the House Judiciary Committee has opened hearings into the Mueller Report, I feel we are on the road to bring a reckoning to the Trump administration.

Thomas Dresser
Oak Bluffs

4 COMMENTS

    • Obstruction includes when a person interferes, attempts to interfere, or conspires to interfere in an investigation or judicial process.

    • geno— there are dozens of crimes identified in this report.
      Your argument seems to be that if the obstruction effort is successful, then it’s fine to obstruct an investigation. You can wrap a flag around yourself on that one.

  1. Not true. Obstruction, according to statute, applies also to an “official proceeding” or investigation: according to 18 U.S. Code CHAPTER 73— OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE 18 U.S. Code § 1512.
    “(b) Whoever knowingly uses intimidation, threatens, or corruptly persuades another person, or attempts to do so, or engages in misleading conduct toward another person, with intent to—
    (1) influence, delay, or prevent the testimony of any person in an official proceeding;
    (2) cause or induce any person to—
    (A) withhold testimony, or withhold a record, document, or other object, from an official proceeding;
    (B) alter, destroy, mutilate, or conceal an object with intent to impair the object’s integrity or availability for use in an official proceeding;
    (C) evade legal process summoning that person to appear as a witness, or to produce a record, document, or other object, in an official proceeding; or
    (D) be absent from an official proceeding to which such person has been summoned by legal process.
    the intent to impair the object’s integrity or availability for use in an official proceeding; or
    (2) otherwise obstructs, influences, or impedes any official proceeding, or attempts to do so,
    shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both.
    (d) Whoever intentionally harasses another person and thereby hinders, delays, prevents, or dissuades any person from—
    (1) attending or testifying in an official proceeding;
    (2) reporting to a law enforcement officer or judge of the United States the commission or possible commission of a Federal offense or a violation of conditions of probation 1 supervised release,,1 parole, or release pending judicial proceedings;
    (3) arresting or seeking the arrest of another person in connection with a Federal offense; or
    (4) causing a criminal prosecution, or a parole or probation revocation proceeding, to be sought or instituted, or assisting in such prosecution or proceeding;
    or attempts to do so, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 3 years, or both.

Comments are closed.

Previous articleServices for John Joseph Klingensmith Sr.
Next articleBrew and bee event a success