Readying for summer, Martha’s Vineyard Museum reopens exhibits

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The Martha's Vineyard Museum in Vineyard Haven. — Courtesy M.V. Museum

With summer on the doorstep, the Martha’s Vineyard Museum is reopening the remaining spaces previously closed due to the pandemic; the museum is expanding hours as well. A number of new exhibits have also been installed, according to a press release from the museum.

Since last weekend, the buildings are now open from 10 am until 5 pm Wednesday to Sunday, and until 8 pm on Tuesdays. Tuesday nights will once again feature the ArtCliff food truck from 5 to 8 pm every week. Tables are available to picnic, or guests are invited to bring their own chairs or blanket. Museum admission applies during all Tuesday open hours for guests who wish to go inside, however, it is not required to enjoy the outdoor campus and the food truck.

Admission pricing will return to prepandemic prices, including bringing back special, year-round Islander rates. (Visit mvmuseum.org/visit for pricing.) Although free Tuesday nights are not being offered this year, beginning this week, Wednesdays will be pay what you can for all visitors. Admission is also always free for members year-round.

After reading and discussing the latest CDC guidance and listening to state and local officials, the museum will follow the state of Massachusetts in lifting the mask mandate, the press release states. 

“This being said, the campus, both inside and out, is mask-friendly. Members and visitors are encouraged to do whatever makes them feel most comfortable,” the release says. “Hand sanitizer stations remain set up throughout the building, and social distancing is always encouraged. Anyone visiting is asked to please be respectful and kind to others regardless of their mask preference.”

The do-touch, interactive kids’ exhibit “Hands-On History” reopened recently with alterations in place to ensure families can enjoy the space safely. The First Light Café will reopen in mid-June. New to the galleries is “Selling Martha’s Vineyard.” The exhibit, open through August 3, tells the story of how boosters and businessmen marketed the Island to tourists and vacation homebuyers following the increase in tourism in the late 1860s. “Life in Reverse: The Remarkable World of Richard Lee” is open through July 25, and “Nature and Change: Stories from the Anthropocene” remains on display through July 11.